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  1. Paul 4 years ago4 years ago

    Just a note to our EdSource Today hosts: It's exciting that you're branching out into dynamic content, with Twitter feeds, video, and so on! I do want to let you know that this particular article loads very slowly on desktop browsers, due to its scripts and its large, non-optimized image files (four images at over 300 K apiece!). If you try to access the article using the standard Safari browser on Apple mobile devices (iPhone, iPad, and iPod … Read More

    Just a note to our EdSource Today hosts:

    It’s exciting that you’re branching out into dynamic content, with Twitter feeds, video, and so on!

    I do want to let you know that this particular article loads very slowly on desktop browsers, due to its scripts and its large, non-optimized image files (four images at over 300 K apiece!).

    If you try to access the article using the standard Safari browser on Apple mobile devices (iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch), whether with your site’s mobile or desktop theme, the images are excruciatingly slow to load, and attempting to view the videos can crash the browser app.

    It’s a good idea to optimize image files for the Web, to embed video using standard, cross-platform methods, and to test the results on mobile browsers.

    Thanks for considering these suggestions!

  2. Bill Younglove 4 years ago4 years ago

    For an “educational renaissance” to occur, the current reforms being undertaken (e.g., implementation of the Common Core State Standards) must do something unprecedented: Put the students and teachers at the center of the decisions and changes to be made; not top, tech, and government and foundations and commercial enterprises downward.