Photo: Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times/Polaris
Gladys Alvarez, a 5th grade teacher at Manchester Ave. Elementary School in South Los Angeles, talks to her students during a meet and greet on Aug. 19. Alvarez was sitting inside her empty classroom while conducting the virtual zoom class.

As school districts across California move forward with distance learning, many are navigating the complicated realities of this year’s essential back-to-school item: webcams.

California state law requires students to interact with their peers and teachers every day during distance learning. Fostering those connections can be difficult without seeing faces, teachers and administrators say, but requiring cameras to stay on during class can be difficult for students who lack a stable internet connection or feel anxious on screen.

Some districts, like Lakeside Union in San Diego County, require students to keep their video on during class. In a distance learning environment where teachers and students can’t be in the same location, maintaining face-to-face contact is critical to keeping students connected to their teachers and other students, said Superintendent Andy Johnsen.

“It’s about engagement for us,” Johnsen said. “I’m really worried about the toll this is taking on our kids, so we want to make sure we can see them, and they can see their classmates and teachers.”

Whether a district wants to set rules around camera use is a local decision, and the state does not have any official guidance on whether cameras should be on or off during class, said Cynthia Butler, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Education.

Hunter Valdez, a senior at James Lick High School in San Jose, said nearly all of his teachers allow students to choose whether they want to keep their cameras and microphones on during class. He likes the policy because he doesn’t feel comfortable sharing his bedroom on screen.

“My room is my private space. I don’t like having my camera on and people being able to look at it and judge my posters or how messy or clean it is. It weirds me out,” Valdez said. “Being able to have my camera turned off gives an added sense of privacy.”

In many districts, students are expected to appear on screen but won’t face harsh consequences if their cameras are off, especially if it is due to spotty internet or other issues at home preventing them from appearing on screen.

When students’ webcams are off, it can be difficult to know if they are confused, bored, excited, or in need of anything at home, said Morelia Rivas, a fourth-grade teacher at Manzanita SEED in Oakland Unified.

“It creates an additional step to assessing engagement that becomes more challenging,” she said. “You need to keep a list of who isn’t using the camera and if they are turning in assignments and asking questions.”

Even Valdez admits that it’s harder for him to pay attention when his camera or his teacher’s camera is off.

“As much as I don’t like having the camera on, no one can see if I’m on my phone or if I’m distracted when it’s off,” he said, adding that he is more likely to turn the camera on when it’s with a teacher he has a good relationship with.

Webcam anxieties may also stem from fears over discipline and invasion of privacy. Schools are increasingly adopting technologies that rely on camera surveillance to monitor students, such as remote proctoring tools, and other apps that can track location, device usage and other web-browsing data.

Students’ names and images, which appear in virtual classroom settings, are considered personally identifiable and subject to protections under the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. The law applies to all publicly funded schools and gives parents the right to access their student’s education records and to request changes to those records if they contain an error.

Many privacy experts caution against jumping on board with video conferencing tools before thoroughly vetting their security and privacy settings first.

“A lot of these technologies are being rolled out very quickly with little opportunity for parents or students to opt out of even consent,” said Lindsay Oliver, activism project manager at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a national nonprofit that researches and advocates for digital privacy. “It’s Covid times, and administrators have to make decisions quickly. But I’m concerned about how quickly it’s happening and whether due diligence is being followed.”

There are many scenarios where a student’s privacy could be compromised in an online class setting, Oliver said: “Maybe you ask a question that someone finds silly and takes a video of you and that gets posted online to social media. That’s not being hacked, but that is a way that your privacy could be invaded.”

The Electronic Frontier Foundation recently created a guide for students to better understand how educational apps can track their data, and what students can do to protect their privacy.

This fall, most of Rivas’ students keep their cameras on during class meetings. But when classes moved online in the spring, some kept cameras off due to anxiety about being on screen or revealing too much about their home life.

“Kids are also really curious about each other. To have other kids wanting to see your new environment and be all up in your business, that’s a lot of pressure,” Rivas said.

“I remember when I was 7 and having a very clear idea about what the differences were between myself and my peers. And those differences are very material, like what shoes you have on,” she added. “Students who don’t have those things are the ones most keenly aware of those differences.”

Keeping cameras on won’t guarantee that students stay engaged. And Rivas said some students actually seem to participate more via chats and off-camera assignments or check-ins, even with their cameras off.

“The tension here is keeping students comfortable and confident to choose the mode of expression they want while still allowing personality and personal touch to come through,” said Josh Weiss, an educational technology specialist at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education. “The camera doesn’t have to be on for that, but there does have to be extra effort.”

Seeing someone’s face is only one component of academic engagement, according to Shawn Kim, director of Digital Learning Initiatives at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education. The learning material itself, how it’s presented and what’s happening at home are a few other contributing factors.

Kim recommends trying different styles to check if students are paying attention, like using polls during class, interactive whiteboards or reaction buttons like a thumbs-up.

“Zoom fatigue is real. You’re continuously staring at yourself and someone else’s face. When you’re in a classroom, you have peripheral vision and can look around,” said Kim, who along with Weiss has been researching teachers’ experience with distance learning during the coronavirus pandemic. “In Zoom, it’s like sharing your personal space with 50 people.”

To connect with kids who don’t show up to class or turn their camera on, Rivas, the fourth-grade teacher in Oakland, is doing virtual home visits, meaning a video call with parents to check in and find out why a student was absent or kept the camera off.

“If I’m not seeing the student and not seeing the family,” she said, “there’s something I need to work on here.”

In many districts, such as Clovis Unified in Fresno County, students are expected to keep their cameras on during class, but exceptions can be made for students whose families may not want their child on screen.

“We recognize there are challenges for some students. If there is a compelling need not to be on camera, we will have that conversation,” said Kelly Avants, spokeswoman for Clovis Unified. “But the expectation will be to have kids be on screen. It also allows us to keep track of if that’s really the student on the other side.”

To help students who feel uneasy about sharing their home workspace, the district created images with school mascots and logos that students can use as a backdrop during live lessons.

Valdez, the student in San Jose, said he uses a virtual background when he does use the camera in class and that it helps him feel more comfortable appearing on screen. But backgrounds on video conferencing platforms such as Zoom are not compatible with all devices, limiting that solution for some students.

In South San Francisco Unified, students are also expected to keep their cameras on during distance learning, but district officials said students are not required to do so. The district has set up an opt-out form for families who do not want their child to participate in educational activities online that may be recorded.

Few parents have chosen to opt out so far, said Peter Feng, a spokesman for the district.

This back-to-school season is a critical time for building comfort with students online, said Weiss, the educational technology specialist at Stanford. His advice? Address students’ concerns and preconceived ideas about cameras and online education at the start.

“A lot of engagement is going to involve getting past the biases of what students think online learning could be,” Weiss said. “A lot of teachers bring out their best lesson plans that first week of school to show how exciting learning can be. Why not use that same pattern in the online learning space?”

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  1. Lisa 4 weeks ago4 weeks ago

    As a teacher, it's our job to make sure that each student feels comfortable in the classroom. Online classes have made that a challenge. Some kids may not want to share what's inside their homes, while others may be ashamed of their looks, and they have the power to hide their faces when in a virtual classroom. I understand the cons of having your screen on, but it makes it hard to see if a … Read More

    As a teacher, it’s our job to make sure that each student feels comfortable in the classroom. Online classes have made that a challenge. Some kids may not want to share what’s inside their homes, while others may be ashamed of their looks, and they have the power to hide their faces when in a virtual classroom.

    I understand the cons of having your screen on, but it makes it hard to see if a student is engaged in learning, distracted, or in need of some help. Forcing a student to turn their camera on is like forcing them to invite you into their house. So, teachers, please make an effort to talk to a student and come up with something that helps them feel comfortable but at the same time, helps you know what they’re up to.

  2. Kathy Person 7 months ago7 months ago

    I truly believe there should always be a recordable camera on inside the classroom at all times. Parents should have access to check on not only their child but the teachers also. We send our children to school trusting they are safe but that’s not always the case. My son taught school in Korea they all have camera in classrooms. As far as these kids complaining they don’t want anyone to see their surroundings, … Read More

    I truly believe there should always be a recordable camera on inside the classroom at all times. Parents should have access to check on not only their child but the teachers also. We send our children to school trusting they are safe but that’s not always the case.

    My son taught school in Korea they all have camera in classrooms. As far as these kids complaining they don’t want anyone to see their surroundings, put a backdrop up behind you. Problem solved. The real problem is children are being raised to feel entitled to do what they want. Whatever happened to rules that everyone should just follow. If you have to be in a classroom, your face should be in class……

    Replies

    • Demi 6 months ago6 months ago

      This comment is one of those declarations that starts out rational, and then devolves into "ugh kids these days are so entitled, when I was your age I walked 10 miles uphill to class and never complained". There a variety of reasons why kids, from elementary to college, might now want their cameras on. Maybe they don't want strangers staring into their living space, maybe they're anxious about the way they look, maybe they aren't … Read More

      This comment is one of those declarations that starts out rational, and then devolves into “ugh kids these days are so entitled, when I was your age I walked 10 miles uphill to class and never complained”.

      There a variety of reasons why kids, from elementary to college, might now want their cameras on. Maybe they don’t want strangers staring into their living space, maybe they’re anxious about the way they look, maybe they aren’t comfortable showing their faces online and potentially recording them, maybe they have garbage WiFi and having the camera strangles everything else.

      Heck maybe you’re right and they wanna be lazy in bed, but it’s a teacher’s job to ensure that students feel safe, secure, and like they can succeed. If a child feels more comfortable with the camera off then let them keep it off. You can ask them to inform you ahead of time, let them know days when cameras will be mandatory, but this is online. There is no classroom, and trying to act as though you can copy-paste one format onto the other isn’t realistic.

  3. Susan 7 months ago7 months ago

    I understand students feeling uncomfortable but in the classroom, they aren't allowed to pull a jacket over their head and hide or just leave the room. To allow screens to be off is not teaching them responsibility. They should set up a desk at home that doesn't show their room. When parents reinforce structure in the home it'll only strengthen the child and put him at a lesser risk for getting sick upon the … Read More

    I understand students feeling uncomfortable but in the classroom, they aren’t allowed to pull a jacket over their head and hide or just leave the room. To allow screens to be off is not teaching them responsibility. They should set up a desk at home that doesn’t show their room. When parents reinforce structure in the home it’ll only strengthen the child and put him at a lesser risk for getting sick upon the return to school. Teachers need to see students’ faces to check for understanding.

    Replies

    • Madilynn Paker 6 months ago6 months ago

      I have got good grades. I have As and a B.

    • AE 6 months ago6 months ago

      This is a very priveleged comment. Many students do not even have their own desk let alone their own room. Acting like they should pick and choose where they put their desk is assuming far too many things about the family and their home.

  4. Harper 8 months ago8 months ago

    As a student using Google Meet, I can say that having everyone’s camera on causes a lot of lag and makes it almost impossible to do things like watch videos. It is harder to focus when cameras are off, however.

  5. CC 8 months ago8 months ago

    I am surprised there is not more in this article about the negative impact of having cameras on. I especially question how having cameras on for classes with over 30 students is useful. The focus should be on the lesson, but often it is sidelined by whoever's family is most active in the background. In my middle school history department meeting we had five teachers saying that they only do cameras at the beginning of … Read More

    I am surprised there is not more in this article about the negative impact of having cameras on. I especially question how having cameras on for classes with over 30 students is useful. The focus should be on the lesson, but often it is sidelined by whoever’s family is most active in the background. In my middle school history department meeting we had five teachers saying that they only do cameras at the beginning of class, require and have good participation in the chat box, and find cameras to be extremely distracting. We had one teacher advocating for cameras because he says when he cold calls the students with cameras off they take longer to answer. My thought is that cold calling is too slow with this format anyway.

    Our admin do not have the experiences we have and they keep pushing for cameras on. I do not think they would if they actually taught our demographic themselves. Most of the students express appreciation that they can have cameras off, participate on chat or verbally, and they say they are less exhausted from class with cameras mostly off (I do allow for free choice), and have more stamina to do their next Zoom class. Having cameras on for Zoom after Zoom really feels like torture for many kids and adults who actually have to do it.

  6. Debi Netzly-Lewis 8 months ago8 months ago

    I find the “privacy” an unconvincing argument. Students constantly plaster themselves all over social media, but won’t allow it for engagement and learning. This is our new classroom and classroom management expectations need to apply to everyone.

    Replies

    • Jonh 6 months ago6 months ago

      I feel like "constantly plaster" is a bad choice of words. I am a high school student, and I don't even have any type social media. Most of my friends are too busy to be constantly updating their profile. And the people who do post pictures of themselves tend to do so because they want to feel good or better about themselves. Being pictured online without consent can be a problem. What you are … Read More

      I feel like “constantly plaster” is a bad choice of words. I am a high school student, and I don’t even have any type social media. Most of my friends are too busy to be constantly updating their profile. And the people who do post pictures of themselves tend to do so because they want to feel good or better about themselves.

      Being pictured online without consent can be a problem. What you are saying is equivalent to “some people use social media, so why should everyone else worry about having their faces unknowingly and unwillingly posted all over the internet” Not to mention, most of the people I know that do use social media, have settings adjusted so only friends can see posts and pictures. I tend to get the feeling that someone is always watching me, so I get anxious whenever I have my video on.

      Sure, turning on your webcam can be used for educational purposes, but you can tell whenever a classmate(s) is staring at you when you’re physically at school, versus digital learning.

  7. Michael Flood 8 months ago8 months ago

    It is worth noting that moving to bi-directional video effectively doubles the bandwidth and data consumption requirements for all students.

  8. Mike Barrett 8 months ago8 months ago

    This should not be a biggie. Free choice – right? Allow the students/parents the option and then as a faculty member – deal with it. Some people are comfortable – others are not. This should not be a one-size fits all.

  9. Giselle S Galper 8 months ago8 months ago

    Why doesn’t the state work with Zoom to have a mandatory digital backdrop for all students in public schools? This is a simple solution that equalizes everyone.

  10. el 8 months ago8 months ago

    I have been working remote for many years and I do a lot of video meetings. Some of the people I work with like having video on and some prefer it off. I find that I get better quality audio and a better experience with my video off, and that video on is much more tiring. I keep video on for some meetings where it is important to others, but among the people I meet … Read More

    I have been working remote for many years and I do a lot of video meetings.

    Some of the people I work with like having video on and some prefer it off. I find that I get better quality audio and a better experience with my video off, and that video on is much more tiring. I keep video on for some meetings where it is important to others, but among the people I meet with daily, we use video rarely. The compromise that works for me is to use video when I am talking and to turn it off when I am not. I’d rather have clean, clear audio than jerky video any day, and jerky video actually decreases the communication in my experience.

    Although adding backgrounds is possible in Zoom, it’s worth understanding that the computational power to render them is substantial and can degrade the performance of your actual communication. I also find sometimes that they can be distracting and blend into the video of the person, especially if the person was not in front of a plain background or running on a beefy computer.

    A better way to see if students are paying attention is to ask them to interact via questions, text chat, or the various reaction methods, rather than trying to stare intently at 30 faces on screen.