The following is the first in a series of commentaries on the emerging teacher shortage in California. This one focuses on what the state of California can do to address the shortage.  

Linda Darling-Hammond

CREDIT: LPI

Linda Darling-Hammond

As California has embarked on an ambitious journey to raise standards for student learning and rethink nearly every aspect of its educational system, one of the state’s most pressing challenges is hiring and retaining well-prepared, high-quality teachers who can teach the challenging new skills our society demands. This is especially true when the state faces teacher shortages like those emerging now.

Make no mistake, the teacher shortage is real. The Learning Policy Institute’s recent report “Addressing California’s Emerging Teacher Shortage: An Analysis of Sources and Solutions” found that, after sharp declines in teacher education enrollments over the last decade, recent hiring increases left many districts scrambling to find teachers. As districts began to restore teaching positions eliminated during the Great Recession, credentials issued to new teachers were at an historic low.

Patrick Shields

Patrick Shields

And nearby states, also experiencing shortages, were luring away many of these teachers with promises of good salaries and lower housing costs.

As a result, the number of teachers hired in 2015 without having completed – or sometimes even begun – their preparation soared, reaching one-third of all new credentials issued in the state. Although shortages are occurring across a range of subject areas, the problem is most acute in mathematics, science and special education. In special education, barely half (52 percent) of new teachers are fully prepared. Bilingual teachers and those with training to teach English language acquisition are also in short supply. A small increase in individuals entering preparation this year was nowhere close to the level of demand, and, further, was not in the fields that have the greatest need.

As was true in previous eras of shortage, the dearth of qualified teachers is felt most acutely in schools serving more low-income and minority students. According to California’s educator equity plan, in 2013-14, twice as many students in high-minority as in low-minority schools were being taught by a teacher who had not completed – or even enrolled in – a preparation program.

Demand is projected to grow further as districts continue to recover from the recession and seek to replace the programs and positions they eliminated, as they also cope with attrition, which averages about 8 percent of all teachers annually. This includes inevitable retirements – fully one-third of California teachers are over 50 and 10 percent are over 60 years old – but most attrition is due to younger teachers leaving. The reasons range from economic concerns to dissatisfaction with teaching conditions, such as large classes, lack of materials, accountability pressures, lack of administrative supports and lack of public appreciation.

To meet the projected demand, the number of new teachers entering the classroom would need to nearly double – something that is unlikely to happen without changes that seriously improve the attractiveness of the profession.

What can the state do?

No single policy can solve California’s teacher shortage. What is needed is a comprehensive set of strategies at the state and local level. State government can play a particularly strategic role by strengthening recruitment efforts and making it more economically feasible for young people and career changers to become teachers. Districts, for their part, can concentrate on improving local teaching conditions and increasing retention.

A set of strategic initiatives the state enacted in the late 1990s dramatically reduced shortages at that time. However, those programs have all gone by the wayside, eliminated during budget cutbacks. It’s time again to act, making investments that increase the attractions to teaching, rather than lowering the standards.

Where to start? Most importantly, we should work to keep the teachers we have now. It is conventional wisdom in the business world that retaining employees is much more cost-effective than the kind of revolving door currently seen in the teaching profession. Studies show that high turnover reduces student achievement; furthermore, it can cost more than $15,000 to replace each teacher who leaves – money that could be more productively spent on the mentoring that would allow them to stay. Evidence shows that fully prepared teachers leave at half the rate of those who have to learn on the job, and novices who receive mentoring from experienced peers are also much more likely to stay.

At the state level, California policymakers can:

  • Restore the CalTeach recruitment centers, which can attract new entrants and teachers from other states and provide information about where to find training and jobs.
  • Rekindle research-proven strategies, like service scholarships and forgivable loans to underwrite teachers’ preparation for the fields and communities where they are most needed.
  • Launch innovative residency programs in high-need communities. These programs underwrite preparation for diverse, committed recruits who train in fields where there are shortages under the wing of the most expert teachers while they complete the coursework for a credential. Graduates continue to receive mentoring as they pay back this investment with years of teaching service.
  • Open up avenues to teaching through career pathways that launch high school students toward the profession, create options for paraprofessionals to become credentialed, and develop new program models for undergraduates who are interested in teaching.
  • Ensure that all beginning teachers have access to a high-quality, affordable induction program through stronger accreditation and strategic programmatic support.
  • Provide incentives that support teachers’ ability to stay in or reenter the profession through strategies like mortgage guarantees for housing, ease of credential renewal, streamlined reciprocity with other states, and opportunities to continue teaching and mentoring after retirement.

California has solved this problem before and can do so again by restoring programs that worked, investing in teacher recruitment and training, and signaling the value with which the state views its teachers. These investments can offer long-term payoffs by increasing retention, saving the dollars wasted on high turnover, and improving outcomes for all of California’s students.

•••

Linda Darling-Hammond is president of the Learning Policy Institute, a research and policy organization in Palo Alto. Patrick Shields is executive director of the organization. 

The opinions expressed in this commentary represent those of the authors. EdSource welcomes commentaries representing diverse points of view. If you would like to submit a commentary, please review our guidelines and contact us.

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  1. Maryann Walsh 2 months ago2 months ago

    Perhaps California should strongly consider offering teacher reciprocity; Nevada, Arizona, New Jersey and Florida accept credentials from other states

  2. Thomas Hatch 5 months ago5 months ago

    I have retired from the military and wanted to give back to community. I went back to school got my degree went through a credential program. I struggle with testing (traumatic brain injury/post-traumatic stress disorder) but passed my CBEST and CSET. The RICA a four hour test is ridiculous, I have taught 1st grade all year and my students, parents and administrators love me but if I don't pass the RICA I … Read More

    I have retired from the military and wanted to give back to community. I went back to school got my degree went through a credential program. I struggle with testing (traumatic brain injury/post-traumatic stress disorder) but passed my CBEST and CSET. The RICA a four hour test is ridiculous, I have taught 1st grade all year and my students, parents and administrators love me but if I don’t pass the RICA I will not have a job in the fall.
    I understand that we must be competent but isn’t the credential program enough.

  3. Sam Jones 10 months ago10 months ago

    The average teacher salary in California is $58,000. A mortgage is $380,000 and rent for a two bedroom apartment is $1,700 in most suburbs and urban areas in California. How can you afford to teach and live in the state? Housing alone makes it impossible if you're a first-time buyer. And teachers typically spend 5-6 years to get degree and credential. So now they have $70,000 in student loans that they owe to colleges that … Read More

    The average teacher salary in California is $58,000. A mortgage is $380,000 and rent for a two bedroom apartment is $1,700 in most suburbs and urban areas in California. How can you afford to teach and live in the state? Housing alone makes it impossible if you’re a first-time buyer. And teachers typically spend 5-6 years to get degree and credential.
    So now they have $70,000 in student loans that they owe to colleges that did little to actually prepare them for the realties of teaching. And the induction programs are often worthless busy work – just what an overworked teacher needs.
    BTSA was a 1 yr program, but the state made it 2 yrs when enrollment in teacher preparation programs went down by half. Why the extra yr? So staff and admin in BTSA could keep their jobs.
    The state should be paying the college tuition for teachers with a 8-year commitment to teach with student loans forgiven. Lenders give veterans low interest rates on housing – why not teachers and other civil servants? Lord knows they need it California. And if districts need more special education and STEM teachers, then PAY for their training.
    To prepare for a Single Subject CSET Math or Science credential, you must take far more math courses than you will ever need to teach most math classes in middle school or high school. Change that already!
    And is there ever any parent or student accountability? Teachers do a lot of parenting instead of teaching. There are many common sense, cheap fixes to teacher shortage problem, but the people making the decisions don’t teach.So good luck with that.

  4. Elizabeth 11 months ago11 months ago

    Yep, I am chiming in here as a teacher who is currently being deterred by the CA credentialing process. As a private school teacher, I was hired without a credential and have now taught in the private school environment for years. Now that I want to consider public school (and its accompanying pay raise), I am prohibited by the fact that the small school I've worked for is not WASC-accredited (otherwise, I'd be able to … Read More

    Yep, I am chiming in here as a teacher who is currently being deterred by the CA credentialing process. As a private school teacher, I was hired without a credential and have now taught in the private school environment for years. Now that I want to consider public school (and its accompanying pay raise), I am prohibited by the fact that the small school I’ve worked for is not WASC-accredited (otherwise, I’d be able to use my 5+ years to waive student teaching requirements). The tests are not deterring me; it’s the heavy observation hours and unpaid student teaching that will still be required despite my experience in the classroom—all due to this technicality. After inquiring with several programs, I’ve found that it is highly unlikely for me to be able to obtain a credential without taking time out of the work force and committing significant financial resources toward checking boxes that should be givens at this point in my career. My best option is to find an internship program, for which I’ll have to commute a significant distance. I feel confident that I would meet or exceed standards in observations, but my previous coursework/training in education and English and my classroom experience are basically negated here. As more and more private schools require credentials as well, I’m left seriously considering the economic impact it will have on my future to commit to this process in the state of California. (I mean, there certainly isn’t a massive paycheck or true job security waiting at the end of it all!)

  5. Joanne Dunn 11 months ago11 months ago

    Another reason a lot of students graduating from college are not choosing the Teaching Profession is because California is the only state that requires you to take 2 tests to get your credential. After finishing 5 years of college and student teaching, they feel they should NOT have to pay to take another test. Jobs that require you to pass a test should be given at NO cost. Many people can pass … Read More

    Another reason a lot of students graduating from college are not choosing the Teaching Profession is because California is the only state that requires you to take 2 tests to get your credential. After finishing 5 years of college and student teaching, they feel they should NOT have to pay to take another test. Jobs that require you to pass a test should be given at NO cost. Many people can pass a test with flying colors but can’t teach at all.

    If California wants to eliminate the shortage, take out the test and require them to student teach or intern for One Year. I feel that “on the job” training is the best and you will get more effective teachers. The tests they want you take (Cbest/ Cset) don’t have questions on classroom management, discipline issues, how children succeed, etc.

    Replies

    • PK 9 months ago9 months ago

      I agree with what you said. If California is so short on teachers, the state should consider changing the requirements instead of making more obstacles for those that actually want to teach. As living expenses get higher, the salary for teachers continues to stay the same or hardly increase over time. Teachers do more than just teach. They handle so many issues throughout the day and teach kids much more than what is simply a … Read More

      I agree with what you said. If California is so short on teachers, the state should consider changing the requirements instead of making more obstacles for those that actually want to teach. As living expenses get higher, the salary for teachers continues to stay the same or hardly increase over time.
      Teachers do more than just teach. They handle so many issues throughout the day and teach kids much more than what is simply a part of the curriculum. However, California doesn’t acknowledge that and continues to make more difficult requirements which pushes people away from teaching.
      BTSA was a program that was 1 year before and now it’s 2 years of extra work, more writing lessons, more hours of staying after school without getting paid to do so, and more unnecessary observations. Is it not enough that teachers already have to spend almost 6 years in college to obtain their BA degree and credential while paying off student loans? With all these extra tests administered by companies like Pearson and the 4 TPAs required at the end to even get the preliminary credential, it’s just been turned into a long difficult road with almost no light at the end of that dark tunnel.
      Why would any young person want to take on do much student debt just to go into teaching and give up half ways due to all the unnecessary difficult tedious obstacles? If California wants more teachers, the state should remove all the roadblocks set in place for failure or people just giving up. Other professions with the same amount of schooling get paid much more and they do not have all the obstacles that teachers do or the extra exams and added stress. There are many obvious reasons why California has a shortage of teachers. Are they really that dumb to figure it out?

  6. Mary Jane Guinn 1 year ago1 year ago

    It's no surprise that CA has a teacher shortage. The comment that schools are looking for the cheapest hire and to rid themselves of teachers higher on the pay scale is no secret. It makes me ill to continually hear how CA want "qualified" teachers. Hogwash! Many qualified teachers are denied tenure every year based on the salary. Good luck finding new teachers straight out of college, folks. Online chat forms are filled with discussions … Read More

    It’s no surprise that CA has a teacher shortage. The comment that schools are looking for the cheapest hire and to rid themselves of teachers higher on the pay scale is no secret. It makes me ill to continually hear how CA want “qualified” teachers. Hogwash! Many qualified teachers are denied tenure every year based on the salary. Good luck finding new teachers straight out of college, folks. Online chat forms are filled with discussions warning them that one day they, too, will be on the chopping block for no other reason than rising to the top of the pay scale.

    Replies

    • John Fensterwald 1 year ago1 year ago

      Mary Jane: Since nearly all teachers seeking tenure would start at the bottom of the pay scale, I am confused why you assert they are denied tenure based on salary.

  7. JIAJUN TANG 1 year ago1 year ago

    There are a lot of reasons contributing to today's shortage, especially in the STEM field. One of them is the overly complicated teacher credential process, which takes too much time and money impeding young people to join the teacher team. Moreover, the CTC may consider to attract more foreign teachers abundant in their countries such as China. Actually, I want to become a math/science teacher in California. It seems rather difficult for me to obtain a … Read More

    There are a lot of reasons contributing to today’s shortage, especially in the STEM field. One of them is the overly complicated teacher credential process, which takes too much time and money impeding young people to join the teacher team. Moreover, the CTC may consider to attract more foreign teachers abundant in their countries such as China.
    Actually, I want to become a math/science teacher in California. It seems rather difficult for me to obtain a credential, though I hold a Ph.D. in the field of material physics, and am passionate and qualified enough to teach the high school students.
    For the credential, I need to participate a teacher prep program in CA, finish the CBEST, CSET and CLAN. For participating the 1.5 or 2-year teacher prep program by applying for the grad schools, I need to prepare for the GRE and IELTS. The cost for all of the above items is over $60,000 and nearly three years, which are too burdensome. Moreover, the CSET, paper or electronic exam, is only available in California. This regulation makes the credential more difficult to obtain.
    I am indeed passionate about STEM teaching and hope to help solve the STEM teacher shortage in CA. But it is very difficult for me, a foreign Chinese university teacher with STEM background, to obtain the credential.

  8. Shannon 1 year ago1 year ago

    Where are you getting your facts from??? There is NO teacher shortage in Orange County, CA, Long Beach or surrounding areas. There has not been a teacher shortage since 1998/1999. Districts are still receiving hundreds of applications for 1 position i.e. Los Alamitos School District. I have friends that are trying to get back in to the teaching profession after taking time off to raise their children and they are still unable … Read More

    Where are you getting your facts from??? There is NO teacher shortage in Orange County, CA, Long Beach or surrounding areas. There has not been a teacher shortage since 1998/1999. Districts are still receiving hundreds of applications for 1 position i.e. Los Alamitos School District. I have friends that are trying to get back in to the teaching profession after taking time off to raise their children and they are still unable to get a full time position. Stuck substituting!!!

  9. Deb 1 year ago1 year ago

    I agree that true reform needs to happen to the credentialing process (through CTC). As an out-of-state teacher (HI & FL), it has been an unending process of applying, sending in properly "worded" papers, and then just before the 6-month timeline being told there is one more item needed (after 6-months you must reapply). The fees are now $100 per application, which makes the process even more cumbersome. It takes 2-weeks for the check to … Read More

    I agree that true reform needs to happen to the credentialing process (through CTC). As an out-of-state teacher (HI & FL), it has been an unending process of applying, sending in properly “worded” papers, and then just before the 6-month timeline being told there is one more item needed (after 6-months you must reapply). The fees are now $100 per application, which makes the process even more cumbersome. It takes 2-weeks for the check to be “deposited” into the system, lengthening the overall process. Also, different people review your paperwork each time, so the continuity is lost between applications. It is not only demeaning and paperwork intensive, it demonstrates a lack of true need/concern for students.

    Many top teaching states have efficient online systems for applying, making it easy for people to upload recommendations, communicate with other state teaching boards, and verify experience. In California everything is a good old fashioned paper trail, which gets sent back to you at some point in the future. In addition, if you held a CA Preliminary credential and left the state before changing it to a clear, you are out of luck. It cannot be renewed, even when there are real teacher shortages in your field (i.e., math, science, etc).

  10. John 1 year ago1 year ago

    The commenter who noted that districts are looking for the cheapest “warm body” to fill these positions made a valid point. Retaining and attracting experienced teachers is more important. On the other hand, it shouldn’t be too difficult to lower standards, and put large numbers of inexperienced, incompetent new teachers in front of our large class sizes (larger than any other state). But what is the ultimate cost of that?

  11. Carole White 1 year ago1 year ago

    What a ridiculous article! Truth is, districts are still NOT looking for experienced teachers – they are looking for the cheapest warm body they can find. It just so happens that those usually tend to be young, inexperienced and uncredentialed. I know several teachers with excellent evaluations and clear credentials who are still unable to find a position in the public school market.

  12. Ainsworth 2 years ago2 years ago

    GET RID OF THE 5 YEAR LEVEL 1 (or PRELIMINARY) CREDENTIAL AND GIVE ALL TEACHERS, ESPECIALLY OUT-OF-STATE LICENSED TEACHERS, A NORMAL CREDENTIAL. I am a teacher who has been teaching for more than 8 years in another state and California isn't easy to get a teaching license (aka "teaching credential") The nonsense of getting a Level 1 teaching credential requires all teachers (licensed from other states included) to go through more schooling, frustrating paperwork and … Read More

    GET RID OF THE 5 YEAR LEVEL 1 (or PRELIMINARY) CREDENTIAL AND GIVE ALL TEACHERS, ESPECIALLY OUT-OF-STATE LICENSED TEACHERS, A NORMAL CREDENTIAL. I am a teacher who has been teaching for more than 8 years in another state and California isn’t easy to get a teaching license (aka “teaching credential”) The nonsense of getting a Level 1 teaching credential requires all teachers (licensed from other states included) to go through more schooling, frustrating paperwork and time to get their a credential that is equal to the license from other state. It is ridiculous, confusing, discouraging and arrogant for California to require more than any other state to teach in their schools.

    The bureaucracy of trying to teach in California made me turn around and return to my home state where I didn’t have to go through this headache. The credential process for the state of California is a great contributor to the loss of teachers in this state, especially when other states (like Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, just to name a few) make it easy to teach by issuing teaching licenses without all of the confusion!!!

  13. Quinton Douglass Crawford 2 years ago2 years ago

    There is another set of options that should be enacted. - Credential courses could be subsidized for people enrolled in/and or completed any accredited masters of education program in the nation. All credential programs have too many discouraging expensive startup issues. - Change the 30 day substitute teacher permit to 45 or 60 days. - Include years of overseas teaching experience, and American private school experience in lieu of some courses, towards acceptance as a full … Read More

    There is another set of options that should be enacted.

    – Credential courses could be subsidized for people enrolled in/and or completed any accredited masters of education program in the nation. All credential programs have too many discouraging expensive startup issues.

    – Change the 30 day substitute teacher permit to 45 or 60 days.

    – Include years of overseas teaching experience, and American private school experience in lieu of some courses, towards acceptance as a full time teacher.Most federal jobs and many other state jobs take work experiences in consideration.

  14. Jennifer Peck 2 years ago2 years ago

    On the recommendation to open up avenues to teaching through career pathways - a huge asset California has in this regard, is our more than 4,500 publicly funded after school programs that operate in high-poverty schools, and employ many thousands of young people, from the community, who are interested in working with children. These after school programs can be ideal training ground for careers in teaching, and an ideal infrastructure through which to recruit … Read More

    On the recommendation to open up avenues to teaching through career pathways – a huge asset California has in this regard, is our more than 4,500 publicly funded after school programs that operate in high-poverty schools, and employ many thousands of young people, from the community, who are interested in working with children. These after school programs can be ideal training ground for careers in teaching, and an ideal infrastructure through which to recruit young people with enormous potential.

  15. Anita Johnson 2 years ago2 years ago

    The only real solution is to increase compensation.