Louis Freedberg

With the adoption of the Common Core standards by 43 states, the nation’s schools have embarked on one of the most ambitious reform strategies in the post-World War II era.

Opposition to the new academic standards, however, has emerged on several fronts. Some states are threatening to withdraw from the Common Core altogether. Nationally, support among the general public is shaky and eroding, at least based on the results of recent polls.

By contrast, the situation is different in California, where the prospect of implementing the Common Core without significant resistance seems greater than in many other states.

Here are eight reasons why:

1. All major legislative bodies – and relevant office holders – support the Common Core. 

Gov. Jerry Brown, the state Legislature, the State Board of Education and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson back the Common Core. Even in the heated race for state superintendent, Torlakson’s opponent, Marshall Tuck, backs the new standards. Because Brown is expected to be in office for the next four years, and the Legislature will remain in Democratic hands, that is unlikely to change, even if Tuck changes some of the education dynamics if he is elected in November.

2.  There is no significant public opposition to the Common Core.

Most of the opposition to the Common Core has come in heavily red states. Legislation to repeal or roll back participation in the Common Core has been approved in the Republican strongholds of Oklahoma, North and South Carolina, and Indiana. California is a deeply blue state – Republicans make up a declining share of the electorate and have an increasingly marginal influence in the Legislature.

In some states, like New York, there is rising opposition from the progressive left, especially among teachers. The New York State United Teachers union voted earlier this year to withdraw its support because of the top-down implementation there and other reasons. It’s possible that similar opposition will emerge in California. But so far that has not occurred to any significant extent. National Education Association chief Dennis Van Roekel in endorsing the New York teachers even praised California for involving teachers in “crafting the implementation plan from the beginning.”

3.  All four higher education systems in California strongly endorse the Common Core.

All four systems of higher education in the state – the University of California, the California State University, the California Community Colleges and the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities – have come out strongly in favor of the Common Core and pledged in different ways to work toward its successful implementation. In a public letter, the heads of the four systems said the Common Core “has the potential to dramatically improve college readiness and help close the preparation gap that exists for California students.” California is thought to be the only state where the higher education systems have come together in such a unified way.

4.  Teachers unions also support the Common Core.

Ultimately it will be up to teachers – those in the classrooms who are face to face with children on a daily basis – to be responsible for the successful implementation of the new standards.

So far, the California Teachers Association is a strong backer of the Common Core, and the California Federation of Teachers supports it too, although with more reservations.

Some of the support can be ascribed to the fact that both Brown and the State Board of Education did not succumb to pressures from both the Obama administration and advocacy organizations to apply for waivers from the No Child Left Behind that would have required the state to link teacher evaluations to student test scores or other measures of “student academic growth.” As a result, California teachers are less resistant to the Common Core than in states where there were deeper concerns the new assessments that students will take for the first time this spring would be used to label teachers and schools failures.

California is also emphasizing a “support-and-improve” model of accountability, rather than the “test and punish” approach of NCLB – all of which is likely to encourage teacher support for the new reforms rather than alienate them from the outset.

5.  Common Core standards are integrated with other key reforms.

Common Core standards have been fully integrated into other reforms underway in the state – principally California’s reform of its school finance system and the adoption of the Local Control Funding Formula. Under the LCFF, each district must draw up a Local Control and Accountability Plan and specify how it plans to reach goals in eight “priority areas” set by the state. Common Core implementation is one of the eight priority areas school districts are expected to focus on.

6.  California has invested significant resources in Common Core implementation. 

A sign of the state’s commitment to the Common Core was the agreement by Brown and the state Legislature to allocate $1.25 billion for districts to spend on implementing the standards during the 2013-14 school year – specifically for professional development, instructional materials, technology upgrades to ensure smooth administration of online assessments, and for other purposes.

7.  California has been a leader in developing new assessments aligned with the Common Core. 

Unlike some states where opposition to new Common Core assessments, California has been heavily involved in the assessments created by the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium. California is one of the consortium’s “governing states,” which allows it to vote on policy decisions. Stanford University professor Linda Darling-Hammond has been its senior research advisor. Significantly, the consortium will move its operations to California in the fall, when it becomes an independent unit in UCLA’s National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing (CRESST).

8.  Field tests prepared students for taking Smarter Balanced tests in the spring of 2015.

California may well be better prepared than many other states, at least on a technical level, for the full-scale administration of the Smarter Balanced assessments next spring. That’s because the state decided to have all eligible students – about 3 million 3rd-8th graders and 11th graders – take the field test last year, even though the U.S. Department of Education said only a sample of students needed to do so. State officials say the process went relatively smoothly, and are optimistic that at least from a technical perspective the same will occur during the full administration of the assessments this spring.

It’s also true that California has a fractious, at times fickle populace, and popular opposition to the Common Core could emerge from any number of directions. There are other problem areas that could affect the rollout of the new standards in California, including whether teachers are adequately prepared to teach according to the standards, and whether they have curriculum materials that are adequately aligned with them.

“We recognize it will take years to ensure all of our 280,000 teachers are well prepared,” said State Board of Education president Michael Kirst in a recent Education Week interview. “The thing that keeps me up at night is that in a state of our size and complexity we need a large infrastructure to equip our teachers to teach the Common Core.”

For now California appears set to move ahead with the new standards without running into significant opposition, at least in the classroom or on the political front.  What is still unknown is whether the new standards will achieve their long-term goal: ensuring that students graduate from high school prepared to succeed in college or other career pathways.

 


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  1. Karen Crisafulli 1 year ago1 year ago

    Common Core is dangerous due to the stupid use of to many WiFi controlled pads and laptops. Microwave radiation will alter the health of our children while making Gates, Pearson and other standardized testing companies rich! The teachers hate CC math but cannot say anything bad about it for fear of losing their jobs. Parents are frustrated. Kids hate it. My grandson hates the math because it takes too long to produce answers and he … Read More

    Common Core is dangerous due to the stupid use of to many WiFi controlled pads and laptops. Microwave radiation will alter the health of our children while making Gates, Pearson and other standardized testing companies rich! The teachers hate CC math but cannot say anything bad about it for fear of losing their jobs. Parents are frustrated. Kids hate it. My grandson hates the math because it takes too long to produce answers and he thinks it wastes to much time. He was good at math before but is frustrated now! Parents don’t understand it so they cannot help their children. Teachers hate it! What the heck is going on?

  2. Paul Muench 2 years ago2 years ago

    I agree that there is no clear and present danger that California will rescind its decision to require districts to meet the Common Core standards. But there does seem to be some evidence that the resources you mentioned in item 6 are either insufficient or have not been managed correctly. For those interested please see the teacher survey reported by the CTA showing more than half of teachers judging districts as falling short … Read More

    I agree that there is no clear and present danger that California will rescind its decision to require districts to meet the Common Core standards. But there does seem to be some evidence that the resources you mentioned in item 6 are either insufficient or have not been managed correctly. For those interested please see the teacher survey reported by the CTA showing more than half of teachers judging districts as falling short on committing the necessary resources to Common Core.

    http://www.cta.org/Professional-Development/Publications/2014/05/May-2014-Educator/commoncoremain.aspx

  3. Joan 2 years ago2 years ago

    The parents are awakening after seeing the math curriculum this year. In our grade schools the teachers are using Georgia math K-5. What is that about? There is mass confusion re: math instruction, math materials, and kids are caught in the middle.
    By the way, why won’t Smarter Balanced release the test scores? Doesn’t that tell you something?

  4. Kelly 2 years ago2 years ago

    The math was so dumbed-down in middle school that I pulled my kids out and started homeschooling. It is so much better that we’ll never go back to California’s public school system!!

  5. P Dow 2 years ago2 years ago

    My 11yo daughter told me last year that CC was ruining her education. I had not ever expressed to her my negative feelings about CC so for her to come to that conclusion all on her own was huge. People against CC come from all walks of life, all political leanings, and all professions. I know of teachers who teach if because they have to, but are opting their own children out of the testing. … Read More

    My 11yo daughter told me last year that CC was ruining her education. I had not ever expressed to her my negative feelings about CC so for her to come to that conclusion all on her own was huge. People against CC come from all walks of life, all political leanings, and all professions. I know of teachers who teach if because they have to, but are opting their own children out of the testing. Parents in CA haven’t made a fuss because it was implemented so quietly that they didn’t realize there was anything to be upset about! But as time goes on, parents are beginning to understand how detrimental CC is for our students.

  6. Douglas Kasai 2 years ago2 years ago

    As a CA special education public school teacher, I DO NOT see the benefit of CCSS to our special needs students' educational needs and I see no enforcement of any Individualized Education Plan(IEP) that allows our students to be taught as INDIVIDUALS and follow the IEP's guidelines--- a legal documented contract between the parent, student and school district. If the general education and gifted students are being forced to be molded by CCSS, what … Read More

    As a CA special education public school teacher, I DO NOT see the benefit of CCSS to our special needs students’ educational needs and I see no enforcement of any Individualized Education Plan(IEP) that allows our students to be taught as INDIVIDUALS and follow the IEP’s guidelines— a legal documented contract between the parent, student and school district. If the general education and gifted students are being forced to be molded by CCSS, what detrimental effects can our special needs population can be forced to follow(aka fail) CCSS. This is not education, it is indoctrination…

  7. SD Parent 2 years ago2 years ago

    "There are other problem areas that could affect the rollout of the new standards in California, including whether teachers are adequately prepared to teach according to the standards, and whether they have curriculum materials that are adequately aligned with them." Don is right to be concerned. San Diego Unified was fortunate in that the district had already invested in technology (through school bonds), as the "state investment" in Common Core was so meager after years … Read More

    “There are other problem areas that could affect the rollout of the new standards in California, including whether teachers are adequately prepared to teach according to the standards, and whether they have curriculum materials that are adequately aligned with them.”

    Don is right to be concerned. San Diego Unified was fortunate in that the district had already invested in technology (through school bonds), as the “state investment” in Common Core was so meager after years of deprivation that it was insufficient for the purchase of technology, professional development and new instructional materials. Districts had to pick and choose. Even with major technology requirements, the funds here only provided for new math texts–which, along with pacing guides, weren’t available until a couple of weeks before school started (thanks in part to the state’s late adoption of the standards)–and limited professional development (in 2013-14, 5 days of largely school site professional learning communities, in essence the blind leading the blind).

    And because the state has provided little help with Common Core instruction and lesson plan design (part of that “infrastructure” that doesn’t exist in CA and gives Michael Kirst insomnia) to the teachers currently in classrooms, our district is spending roughly $100 million in LCFF funds to pull teachers out of classrooms during 10 instructional days this year to work in school site PLCs. So instead of receiving Common Core instruction, the students sit in classrooms with subs who, at best, know even less about Common Core and are often just a placeholder.

    Bottom line, the truth about how well the state supported Common Core–and how well districts, schools, and teachers implemented it–will be revealed when California’s students’ SBAC test scores are tallied. That’s when you’ll see how parents feel about the new standards (although looking at the feedback already, this is a hot topic). I’m keeping my fingers crossed, but the state’s actions to date and the 11th hour roll-out here hasn’t inspired confidence.

    Replies

    • navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

      Your point about the impact of pulling teachers out of class is important and one that seems to be ignored. That could have been done differently.
      I dont think SBAC results in CA will have anything to do with common core for at least a few years, if ever.

    • Don 2 years ago2 years ago

      On top of SD Parent's concerns is the problem of teacher evaluations linked to test scores - a much- discussed topic for good reason. This has really muddied the waters when it comes to teacher feedback on Common Core and drawn into question strength of the implementation with so many teachers worried about its implication for their futures . As CC is integrally aligned to SBAC assessment and, in turn, teacher evaluation, teachers … Read More

      On top of SD Parent’s concerns is the problem of teacher evaluations linked to test scores – a much- discussed topic for good reason. This has really muddied the waters when it comes to teacher feedback on Common Core and drawn into question strength of the implementation with so many teachers worried about its implication for their futures . As CC is integrally aligned to SBAC assessment and, in turn, teacher evaluation, teachers are understandably reticent to lend or voice support for a new curriculum that has the potential to undermine their own jobs – and rightfully so. There’s no question that the association between student progress and teacher quality is a difficult one to define. Do we need to use this highly controversial means to evaluate the when there are so many other less controversial and arguably more valuable methods to determine how teachers are doing in the classroom? I believe I am legitimately skeptical in accepting as valid a technically inspired evaluation of the highly subjective human qualities that comprise inspired teaching which would be better applied to quality control of machines. Science is not immune to political, economic and social forces.That is to say I am concerned about the way we are treating educators.

      As the evaluation issue applies to students, I ask myself – ” why do we need to compare students against one standard of academic quality based upon what the current powers that be consider valid? Why are we turning education into some kind of Roman spectacle of victors and vanquished? If people wonder why education in America is not respected, it could be that the American tradition of individualism is not in sync with the modern day bean counters and their proxies who run it.

  8. Kathy Mechling 2 years ago2 years ago

    Can’t get past the data mining…follow the money!

  9. Jill 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common Core is the worst thing that could happen to CA education system. We used to have a top math program but now with common core it is nothing more than the dumbing down of math for the lowest common denominator. I am amazed that those pushing this believe our kids are common or even want to be!! Stop this Common crap and get back to teaching our kids what matters!!!!

  10. Rodney Spooner 2 years ago2 years ago

    Reply to Mr. Freedberg - Part 1 of 2. You wrote: "1. All major legislative bodies – and relevant office holders – support the Common Core" You bet they do. These major legislative bodies - and relevant office holders support Common Core because they are motivated by money and power. Especially in the case of Common core, due to the severe recession, the States were desperate for money and The Bill Gates’ Foundation (etal) gave it to … Read More

    Reply to Mr. Freedberg – Part 1 of 2.

    You wrote: “1. All major legislative bodies – and relevant office holders – support the Common Core”

    You bet they do. These major legislative bodies – and relevant office holders support Common Core because they are motivated by money and power. Especially in the case of Common core, due to the severe recession, the States were desperate for money and The Bill Gates’ Foundation (etal) gave it to them for their blind consent to adopt Common Core standards later. Common Core standards were not even written yet so no one actually knew what they were getting in to. Reminds me of Nancy Pelosi’s infamous statement “We must pass the Bill in order to find out what is in it…” With leadership like this is it any wonder that our Republic is in the mess it’s in?!

    Now that parents have discovered what Common Core really is, there is a grassroots movement pushing back against Common Core and will no doubt have an effect on the outcome of this November’s elections.

    You wrote: “2. There is no significant public opposition to the Common Core.”

    Jeremiah 5:21: “Hear this, O foolish and senseless people, who have eyes, but see not, who have ears, but hear not.” In addition to the growing social networking tsunami against Common Core, go to Facebook and search “Common Core” where you will find more. See the many posts of alarm and causes for concern. See insidious Common Core math problems and hear the stories of normal children now in distress.

    Now that parents have discovered what Common Core really is, there is a grassroots movement pushing back against Common Core and will no doubt have an effect on the outcome of this November’s elections and beyond

    You wrote: “3. All four higher education systems in California strongly endorse the Common Core.”

    Average test scores are predicted to go down by 30% (http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/politics/2013/10/8534385/what-new-york-learns-kentucky-about-common-core-education). Many students entering College now are having to take remedial reading and math. The teachers are being blamed for this education failure when it is NOT their fault but rather the Common core curriculum.

    You wrote: “4. Teachers unions also support the Common Core.”

    See comment #1. Additionally, while the Teacher’s unions may support Common Core, the teachers who must deal with the students and parents on a face-to-face basis may see things very differently.

  11. Rodney Spooner 2 years ago2 years ago

    Reply to Mr. Freedberg - Part 2 of 2. You wrote: “5. Common Core standards are integrated with other key reforms.” If Common Core is a failure, then it will prove difficult, if not impossible, to change or get rid of. It should be noted that Common Core curriculum is copyrighted and controlled by a small number of unknown and unaccountable people. If Common Core proves to be ineffective or a complete disaster, the teachers … Read More

    Reply to Mr. Freedberg – Part 2 of 2.

    You wrote: “5. Common Core standards are integrated with other key reforms.”

    If Common Core is a failure, then it will prove difficult, if not impossible, to change or get rid of. It should be noted that Common Core curriculum is copyrighted and controlled by a small number of unknown and unaccountable people. If Common Core proves to be ineffective or a complete disaster, the teachers and frontline educators are not at liberty to say anything against it for fear of losing their jobs. And if they do, who will replace them? People who are MORE liberal and willing to tow the Common Core line.

    You wrote: “6. California has invested significant resources in Common Core implementation.”

    That is an absolute asinine argument and no excuse to justify supporting anything, especially if it is not effective. Common Core was conceived in a backroom and implemented secretly until it was discovered and revealed by parents engaged in their children’s welfare. The public backlash has been loud and clear.

    You wrote: “7. California has been a leader in developing new assessments aligned with the Common Core.”
    Of the 50 States, California ranks among the lowest when it comes to education results despite the fact that it spends nearly half of its State budget on education. (http://blogs.sacbee.com/capitolalertlatest/2014/01/california-schools-rank-low—again—in-education-week-report.html)

    You wrote: “8. Field tests prepared students for taking Smarter Balanced tests in the spring of 2015.

    Common Core Assessment Myths and Realities: Moratorium Needed From More Tests, Costs, Stress (http://www.fairtest.org/common-core-assessments-factsheet).

    Mr. Freedberg, you can put lipstick on a pig, but it’s still just a pig. Common Core is evil on many levels, not just in education, but socially, and to the very livelihood of our Republic. So, take off your rose-colored glasses, roll up your sleeves, and do your homework before writing anything further.

  12. sheetal shah 2 years ago2 years ago

    There is a huge backlash in CA & nationally against common core. You need to get the facts right.

  13. Rodney Spooner 2 years ago2 years ago

    Dear Mr. Freeberg, You are not only wrong about Common Core...you are as wrong as wrong can be. The evidence is all around you. It is compelling and overwhelming. Just perform the basic, rudimentary research and you will realize this. Just google "Common Core" and the top search items are about the controversies of Common Core. Just search YouTube and you will learn the same. I've save you some time and trouble by listing a … Read More

    Dear Mr. Freeberg,

    You are not only wrong about Common Core…you are as wrong as wrong can be. The evidence is all around you. It is compelling and overwhelming. Just perform the basic, rudimentary research and you will realize this. Just google “Common Core” and the top search items are about the controversies of Common Core. Just search YouTube and you will learn the same. I’ve save you some time and trouble by listing a few. I’ve taken the time to do my homework…will you?

    1. Part 1 of 5 Stop Common Core (10:28): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coRNJluF2O4
    2. Part 2 of 5 Stop Common Core (8:11): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8FJ1U90HIg
    3. Part 3 of 5 Stop Common Core (4:21): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnpqT_XirPo
    4. Part 4 of 5 Stop Common Core (3:50): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geLCamWdblE
    5. Part 5 of 5 Stop Common Core (5:29): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjJFjNx6jOI

    And if you truly care about our children’s education under Common Core and not just a tool this is a must see:

    Brilliant anti-Common Core Speech by Dr. Duke Pesta (2:08:31): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Si-kx5-MKSE

    There is far too much compelling evidence to ignore, and more is mounting every day, that Common Core is Corporatism at its evil worst while the taxpayers are saddled with the unsustainable cost while having no input or local control.

    For example, simple math problems are insidiously complicated to the point that the parents dumbfounded at the calculating methods and, as a result, are at a loss to help their children with their homework assignments which only serves to degrade the parents in their child’s eyes. Thus the child becomes more dependent on the “system” and creating a divisive wedge within the family. This was an essential part of Hitler’s strategy to gain control by keeping children away from the influence of their parents.

    Finally, Common Core is NOT common sense. It does the opposite of what it says it purports to do. It is upending traditional education in favor of a paradigm that is not tested and proven. In fact, some of the “experts in their fields” would not sign off on Common Core curriculum for that very reason.

    Education Expert Dr. Sandra Stotsky: Common Core ‘Rather Shady’ (http://edsource.org/2014/california-conditions-favorable-for-common-core-implementation/68521#comment-14469)

    These facts should concern you greatly. If they don’t then I seriously doubt that anything will. I am wholly convinced that Common Core is NOT only bad for our children, who will become our future leaders, it is also bad for our Constitution and the Republic that our Founding Fathers intended.

  14. Tammi Ackerman 2 years ago2 years ago

    I think you need to do some research and fact checking on your article. There is most definitely a whole lot of public Public Opposition to Common Core!

  15. Tracy 2 years ago2 years ago

    I'm surprised at this man's inability to respect every individual family. No significant opposition? Excuse me, Sir, but where have you been? What is your definition of significant, because even from the opposite end of the country, I have access to Common Core opposition pages all over Facebook. Please do some serious research. Read what parents and students are really saying. If your standardized tests are used in any … Read More

    I’m surprised at this man’s inability to respect every individual family.

    No significant opposition? Excuse me, Sir, but where have you been? What is your definition of significant, because even from the opposite end of the country, I have access to Common Core opposition pages all over Facebook. Please do some serious research. Read what parents and students are really saying.

    If your standardized tests are used in any punitive way, they are no better than AIR/PARCC/pick a name. If it’s punitive, it’s not in the best interest of our students, teachers, or schools.

    ONE opposition should be enough for you to stop this disaster. How many parents would it take for you to listen? 10, 150? a million? You, Sir, have plenty, leave your ivory tower, and actually go to the opposition meetings, join the facebook pages and what parents,students, and teachers are REALLY saying. Otherwise, you’re not in your position for the best interest of California Education, but fully support the wasteful spending, unverified standards, punitive assessments, and most important NOT in support of those who teach the children every day.

  16. L Pleyter 2 years ago2 years ago

    Almost every teacher who heard the CCSS pitch recognized the inherent flaws years ago. It was clear from the beginning that this was a cash cow for few and a horribly inappropriate education mandate. Obviously, no one involved understood or cared about children or the classroom. How much money has been funneled to this movement? Billions. What is being improved? Nothing. Teachers are leaving in droves and … Read More

    Almost every teacher who heard the CCSS pitch recognized the inherent flaws years ago. It was clear from the beginning that this was a cash cow for few and a horribly inappropriate education mandate. Obviously, no one involved understood or cared about children or the classroom. How much money has been funneled to this movement? Billions. What is being improved? Nothing. Teachers are leaving in droves and children are shutting down because they can’t learn this way.

    Replies

    • FloydThursby1941 2 years ago2 years ago

      Wonderful. Let's just waste billions and create a new set of testing across a nation of 318 million people and 6 time zones, surely if we do that we'll have a system everyone will unify behind and make work, if only they'd paid attention to a couple details. What is this corporatism issue? It's government run. I'd say we take all the critics and have a huge summit and lock everyone … Read More

      Wonderful. Let’s just waste billions and create a new set of testing across a nation of 318 million people and 6 time zones, surely if we do that we’ll have a system everyone will unify behind and make work, if only they’d paid attention to a couple details. What is this corporatism issue? It’s government run. I’d say we take all the critics and have a huge summit and lock everyone in a room, everyone can voice their concern, but once they finish, everyone get behind it and make it work. It’s extremely difficult to have one standard and make it work and I don’t think the critics respect what a difficult task this was for Obama.

      I read these complaints and Facebook pages and get depressed. I wouldn’t be surprised if Hillary gets in and just does very little on education. I see all these claims that teachers don’t impact performance because of parents and other factors, but that’s also silly. Would you admit one teacher who is 185 for 185 and stays late to meet with kids and parents and helps them individually will tend to do better than a teacher who feels entitled to 11 days off and takes them even if they don’t need them just because they can, so a sub is in who doesn’t teach them much? Should there be some additional money for the former? The current system essentially rewards the teacher who plays hookey. They have to work more, spend money going to work 11 more days, and get not a cent more, it’s all seniority based.

      I really don’t get this obsession. In my opinion a new system will have the same Facebook pages and bickering, which is why I feel they should not agree to re-do it unless all the critics agree to go and stay there till it’s done, and if they are outvoted still work to make it work.

      This has been horrible, these years of complaining. Obama probably wishes he hadn’t bothered now. It’s a very good system, not perfect but why not focus on the positives instead of every potential negative. We’re behind the rest of the world and have to do something, and experts came up with a good system and they get slammed daily.

      You think that all your complaints will lead to some amazing system being put in but you are deluded. It will probably lead to the old status quo and in 20 years we’ll still be below average and have lost an opportunity.

      This may be why we can’t get things done. We’re too obsessed with whining rather than working to improve things. Instead of focusing on what teachers can’t do, why not focus on ways they can make a difference? Things they can do to be better than they are now? Why not at least reward attendance?

  17. Nicky Thole 2 years ago2 years ago

    Wow, really, teachers support it? I would beg to differ knowing that every teacher in my children's school has voiced a very strong opinion against it and that every parent that I speak to, is in a state of shock and disbelief at the work their children are bringing home . The very fact that there have been classes after school hours to teach the parents starting with Kindergarten, how to help their … Read More

    Wow, really, teachers support it? I would beg to differ knowing that every teacher in my children’s school has voiced a very strong opinion against it and that every parent that I speak to, is in a state of shock and disbelief at the work their children are bringing home . The very fact that there have been classes after school hours to teach the parents starting with Kindergarten, how to help their children with homework because it is impossible to understand, should be a red flag. The material is so poorly written with typos everywhere, and problems that are impossible to figure out. Before the children in 1st grade have mastered any type of math facts, they are factoring multiple numbers and told to view simple additional problems as complex number sentences. Their spelling words are the same as the spelling words for 6th grade and have skipped the phonics method of learning to confuse them with words that you cant spell phonetically. Its disgusting. This is COGNITIVE CHILD ABUSE. And no I am not some mother who is pissed that their child is not top of the class, as my 6th grader is top of the class and I am still disgusted with what I am seeing. We have NO SCIENCE BOOK OR SCIENCE CURRICULUM. How is that possible? We have a fantastic science lab. that our PTA paid for and we cant use it because there is no common core science, and we are not allowed to use the books from last year because they are not “aligned”. This is a corporate take over by the private trading companies that now own the copy write to our kids education. They stand to gain 9.3 BILLION in the next few years by implementing this new curriculum with all the new text books, broadband, testing materials etc etc. Make no mistake, THIS IS NOT POLITICAL. IT IS A CORPORATE TAKE OVER. Our children were sold out to the tune of approximately $200.00 per kids. And guess what, we are going to foot the bill for the rest of the Implementation with our tax $’s for years to come. A new curriculum that we didn’t ask for, didn’t approve, had no say in, and that is full of contradictions, that omits vital steps necessary for a child to learn.

  18. Tina Andres 2 years ago2 years ago

    If your definition of "favorable" means that California's teachers, students and parents are ready for an endless nightmare of frustrating test prep, horrible curriculum and inconsistent and inappropriate standards then I suppose you are correct. I have been living this nightmare as a teacher and as a parent for two years now. My students know significantly less this year coming to me in the middle school. Where they would normally have some skills to use … Read More

    If your definition of “favorable” means that California’s teachers, students and parents are ready for an endless nightmare of frustrating test prep, horrible curriculum and inconsistent and inappropriate standards then I suppose you are correct. I have been living this nightmare as a teacher and as a parent for two years now. My students know significantly less this year coming to me in the middle school. Where they would normally have some skills to use in the pursuit of problem solving and critical thinking, they now have significantly fewer skills. I have dealt repeatedly with frustrated parents from my own children’s school as they attempt to help their children with confusing and often incorrect math work. I am now also trying to teach concepts to my students who have never learned those that precede them. Have you ever tried to teach equations with negative integers when the students have never learned them and you aren’t supposed to teach them because they aren’t in your grade level standards? This is what I am living with. Someone should start visiting classroom and talking to parents and teachers before determining that something is “favorable”.

  19. Shazz 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common Core is a gravy train of spillage from those who want to cash in on public education. The methods and assessments are not valid nor reliable. It is a sad day in America when children are being used as pawns to pad the pockets of the rich. Does not matter how many folks approve it or tout the “data analysis on it’s merits”. IT DOES NOT WORK!!

  20. A. Phillips 2 years ago2 years ago

    CCSS are not okay in any way shape or form! Children are no longer allowed to progress at their ability level. They are stuck until their piers catch up with them. CCSS were implemented in such a underhanded and sneaky way intentionally bypassing the ones who matter most and the ones who would have voted it down hard. It was suddenly in the schools without any voice from parents or educators. … Read More

    CCSS are not okay in any way shape or form! Children are no longer allowed to progress at their ability level. They are stuck until their piers catch up with them. CCSS were implemented in such a underhanded and sneaky way intentionally bypassing the ones who matter most and the ones who would have voted it down hard. It was suddenly in the schools without any voice from parents or educators. CCSS is data mining our children to set them on a specific path for work. There isn’t the ability for our children to choose what they want to be when they grow up. It will be set for them instead. CCSS are wrong and not okay. I homeschool my children now and CCSS was one of the biggest reasons I pulled my children out. I will not have my children used in political games and bureaucracy.

  21. Em Renee 2 years ago2 years ago

    To me, it's not about the Standards. We've had standards for decades. General guidelines aren't a bad thing. But, I'm still opposed to the CCSS. Why? Because they come as a package deal with a few things I wholeheartedly disagree with. In order to receive Federal monies, the CCSS adoptions came along with State Longitudinal Data Systems which requires hours and hours and hours of standardized testing, wasting precious … Read More

    To me, it’s not about the Standards. We’ve had standards for decades. General guidelines aren’t a bad thing.

    But, I’m still opposed to the CCSS. Why? Because they come as a package deal with a few things I wholeheartedly disagree with. In order to receive Federal monies, the CCSS adoptions came along with State Longitudinal Data Systems which requires hours and hours and hours of standardized testing, wasting precious learning time and valuable teaching time. Along with the CCSS came intense and demoralizing teacher evaluation systems.

    When it comes to standards, they should be adjustable enough to meet the needs and development of the individual. When two of my children were suddenly struggling in school after the adoption of CCSS, I went to the teacher to discuss how the situation could be remedied. Before starting my own family, I was a teacher and knew most problems could be resolved with simple solutions. I was shocked by what followed. The teachers said it was out of their hands; they were just following what the principal was requiring. So, naturally, I went to the principal. She told me to contact the district because the school was just following their mandates. A little frustrated now, I contacted the local school board. In no uncertain terms, they pointed fingers to the state level. Determined to get answers, I absolutely contacted my state school board reps. By now, I was not surprised when they sent me links to our state’s federal agreements. I read them all. There is NO WAY we have local, or even state control, of these standards. When a parent cannot go into a classroom to find a solution to why their child is struggling, and instead is sent on a long and frustrating journey only to be told it’s basically about federal money: WE HAVE A PROBLEM. WE HAVE DRASTICALLY LOST OUR FOCUS. Education is no longer about teaching or serving children. It’s serving Big Brother.

    Replies

    • Gary Ravani 2 years ago2 years ago

      What state do you live in? CA was roundly criticized for not agreeing to federal requirements, either in RTTT or the NCLB waivers.

  22. Ed Micheli 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common core is bad for a number of reasons. Top down control destroys creativity and comptetition. Teachers are being changed into bureaucrats or clerks.

  23. Virginia Tibbetts 2 years ago2 years ago

    This is one “fractious, at times fickle” citizen, teacher, taxpayer, and CTA member who is adamantly against the Common Core State Standards. I have spent many hours, over 3 years now, researching the CC$$. I am neither fractious nor fickled but rather someone who strongly and solidly knows that these standards and their accompanying tests are wrong for our students. Wake up, citizens of California, before it is too late.

  24. Rachel 2 years ago2 years ago

    Sad, but true. However, in regards to #2, the opposition may not appear “significant” to those looking on, but it feels significant to those opposing. The public has not felt the full effects of the changes yet, but as awareness grows, opposition grows. That is one other thing about CA that should be added to the list: the information given to the public has been minimal and selective, preventing questions and pushback.

  25. betsy savery 2 years ago2 years ago

    Public opposition begins with parents and students, and they are fighting it in your state and in mine. Common Core must go. My children are not "common," nor are they lab rats for this expensive test of education, or any of the many others our public school children will be forced to participate in. I am an educator, and this is not what the experts in my field promote- nor should you. Shame on you- … Read More

    Public opposition begins with parents and students, and they are fighting it in your state and in mine. Common Core must go. My children are not “common,” nor are they lab rats for this expensive test of education, or any of the many others our public school children will be forced to participate in. I am an educator, and this is not what the experts in my field promote- nor should you. Shame on you- do you have school-aged children who attend public school?

  26. Joan Rickard 2 years ago2 years ago

    I think that opposition is light in CA because there hasn’t been any information about it yet. The more I learn the worse it gets. I don’t want my kids learning Common Core. There was no option and no adoption by the parents, it was just shoved down our throats as people learn more I think there will be more opposition.

  27. brandi 2 years ago2 years ago

    Check out Diane Ravitch and her intelligent thorough analysis about public education in the U.S. before going down the regrettable road of implementing common core. Common Core is a mistake and it was never field tested in the U.S. Instead this was pushed into schools and now parents, teachers, and students are the ones suffering under this program. American tax payers are going to oppose this after seeing the mistakes that this program … Read More

    Check out Diane Ravitch and her intelligent thorough analysis about public education in the U.S. before going down the regrettable road of implementing common core. Common Core is a mistake and it was never field tested in the U.S. Instead this was pushed into schools and now parents, teachers, and students are the ones suffering under this program. American tax payers are going to oppose this after seeing the mistakes that this program brings with it. Common Core is a myth ridden fix for public schools and Arne Duncan is inadequate as the Secretary of Education and it is time for a new Secretary of Education.

  28. Lisa 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common Core is destroying public education, our children, and our country! It takes local control away from school boards, teachers, and parents and is against the Constitution! It was written by unqualified individuals with NO experience in education and NONE of it has been proven or tested! Nor did any educators sign off on it! The "standards" are not age appropriate. Our children are the guinea pigs and it is at … Read More

    Common Core is destroying public education, our children, and our country! It takes local control away from school boards, teachers, and parents and is against the Constitution! It was written by unqualified individuals with NO experience in education and NONE of it has been proven or tested! Nor did any educators sign off on it! The “standards” are not age appropriate. Our children are the guinea pigs and it is at their expense! High stakes testing is hurting our children and destroying their love for learning. The data mining is intrusive beyond belief. There is NO reason the government or ANY third parties need access to our children’s private information. This is one big scheme to put more money in the hands of the billionaires and for the government to control the minds of our children! Completely UNACCEPTABLE! This so called “reform” is wrong from any angle you look at it! No one is thinking of the kids and their futures. It is all about the mighty dollar. Parents and educators need to speak out and fight Common Core for the sake of their children’s education and the future of our country! Vote for those willing to rid us of CC COMPLETELY! CC by any other name is also unacceptable!

    Replies

    • el 2 years ago2 years ago

      It appears that someone linked to this article to bring us a round of fresh commenters. Welcome, all. Common Core is not a federal mandate, thus it cannot be unconstitutional (to the US level anyway). Most states, including California, had state standards before they moved to Common Core. I did not hear about a wave of oppression to the idea of a state standard then. There are positives and negatives to Common Core; it's hardly a panacea … Read More

      It appears that someone linked to this article to bring us a round of fresh commenters. Welcome, all.

      Common Core is not a federal mandate, thus it cannot be unconstitutional (to the US level anyway). Most states, including California, had state standards before they moved to Common Core. I did not hear about a wave of oppression to the idea of a state standard then.

      There are positives and negatives to Common Core; it’s hardly a panacea for education in any state, and certainly not in California, where we already had high standards. I think the pressure to adopt them from the Department of Education has been inappropriate, and a lot of money is going into the transition that maybe could be spent better. I’ve said many times that we transition too often between standards and curricula and that the transitions themselves have an educational cost.

      That said, I recommend you take some time to familiarize yourself with what is different between your state’s previous standards and the new ones, so that you can make better arguments about what issues you have with them.

  29. Gail 2 years ago2 years ago

    Why are we implementing something that has no track record to speak of, is not internationally benchmarked as the creators claim, and in the states that have had it the longest is meeting the most opposition?

    It’s dishonest to say there is no real opposition when parents are pulling their kids out to homeschool in mass numbers. Most of those are homeschooling as a direct result of common core and it’s one-size-fits-all approach.

  30. Happy Elf Mom (Christine) 2 years ago2 years ago

    "There is no significant public opposition to the Common Core." How can you possibly say that with a straight face? It doesn't look that way from where I'm sitting. Have you ever spoken to more than three homeschoolers in your life? I doubt it very much. And how much money are is your organisation receiving from pro-CC sources? I notice one of your board of directors, Don Shalvey, either works or has worked … Read More

    “There is no significant public opposition to the Common Core.”

    How can you possibly say that with a straight face? It doesn’t look that way from where I’m sitting. Have you ever spoken to more than three homeschoolers in your life? I doubt it very much.

    And how much money are is your organisation receiving from pro-CC sources? I notice one of your board of directors, Don Shalvey, either works or has worked for the Gates Foundation. I suppose it’s fine to be a paid spokesperson, but do please be forthright about your conflict of interest.

    I’m not trying to be trollish but your obvious lack of objectivity – or even attempt at objectivity – is a big issue here.

  31. Phaedra Glidden 2 years ago2 years ago

    No opposition to Common Core in California? We might be a little behind because it is just now being implemented in our schools, but let me assure you that there is rising opposition to Common Core in California. Many parents are just now learning what Common Core is and how it affects their children. I fully expect our movement to grow as more people become informed. We are hosting a panel … Read More

    No opposition to Common Core in California? We might be a little behind because it is just now being implemented in our schools, but let me assure you that there is rising opposition to Common Core in California. Many parents are just now learning what Common Core is and how it affects their children. I fully expect our movement to grow as more people become informed. We are hosting a panel discussion called “Unveiling Common Core” at the Hanna’s Boy Center in Sonoma, CA on November 6 in which Sandra Stotsky and James Milgram will be explaining why they refused to sign off on the Common Core validation committee. We are looking to inform Parents exactly why these standards are actually lower than the ones we had previously. https://www.facebook.com/CitizensofSonomaCountyAgainstCCSS/photos/a.241069846097629.1073741830.160111534193461/294586134079333/?type=1&theater

  32. Stacey 2 years ago2 years ago

    As a teacher in California I am total against the Common Core standards! Teachers are not prepared and have not received enough training on implementation! The standards are ridiculous and unrealistic especially for K-3 students. The students are not developmentally ready for many of the things being asked of them. My kids are frustrated and cry when asked to so many of the new and "great" things that common core based. Special education students are … Read More

    As a teacher in California I am total against the Common Core standards! Teachers are not prepared and have not received enough training on implementation! The standards are ridiculous and unrealistic especially for K-3 students. The students are not developmentally ready for many of the things being asked of them. My kids are frustrated and cry when asked to so many of the new and “great” things that common core based. Special education students are especially at a disadvantage. They really think that a child that doesn’t speak or even able to sit up on their own is going to be able to take the Smarter Balanced Test. Come on California wake up and oppose common core!!

  33. B Maynard 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common Core is favorable for California ONLY because we are one of the last states to implement it. CCSS was implemented very quietly and long after CCSS had provided educators with a PR website full of taglines and lies that other states have already been alerted to. Every educator I ask about Common Core responds with the same pat answers that the CCSS website doles out without any evidence given to back their highly vague … Read More

    Common Core is favorable for California ONLY because we are one of the last states to implement it. CCSS was implemented very quietly and long after CCSS had provided educators with a PR website full of taglines and lies that other states have already been alerted to. Every educator I ask about Common Core responds with the same pat answers that the CCSS website doles out without any evidence given to back their highly vague statements and promises. Teachers are not encouraged to talk about CCSS; instead, their web pages are directly linked to the Common Core web page. The teachers’ opinions are not valid to the districts when discussing Common Core. THIS CALIFORNIAN IS COMPLETELY AGAINST COMMON CORE AND WE WILL GET RID OF IT!!!

  34. Karen 2 years ago2 years ago

    I’m a CA teacher and my colleagues and I hate common core. The online assessments are horrible and it won’t be long before the union jumps ship.

  35. B Maynard 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common Core is not an education model. It is a work force model. Pushing Algebra 1 to 9th grade and beyond does not allow for Calculus by 12th grade and therefore eliminates the ability for STEM graduation to enter directly into a 4 year college. Look at New York for the best examples of how much CCSS is failing our children. It is not state led. States signed on to implement CCSS a year before … Read More

    Common Core is not an education model. It is a work force model. Pushing Algebra 1 to 9th grade and beyond does not allow for Calculus by 12th grade and therefore eliminates the ability for STEM graduation to enter directly into a 4 year college. Look at New York for the best examples of how much CCSS is failing our children. It is not state led. States signed on to implement CCSS a year before it was ever written which means it was not even available to read or research. Education is big business…if this comment disappears, you can bet that someone has too much to lose!

  36. Susan Colby 2 years ago2 years ago

    1. With any luck at all, Brown WILL NOT be in office for the 4 years. Most parents have never even heard of Common Core and once they see how poorly it will educate their children, the hours spent on useless learning, the fact that Common Core was developed by people that have extremely little experience in educating children, I think you will find that it will be different. People may … Read More

    1. With any luck at all, Brown WILL NOT be in office for the 4 years. Most parents have never even heard of Common Core and once they see how poorly it will educate their children, the hours spent on useless learning, the fact that Common Core was developed by people that have extremely little experience in educating children, I think you will find that it will be different. People may be Democrats but they are not stupid (usually) and they want what is best for their kids. Spending 59 seconds for a teacher to explain how to get 15 + 5 is not a productive use of classroom time. Not to mention that the stress that is put on the kids now is incredible. China stopped doing the mandated testing because of too many suicides of grammar school kids due to the testing.

    2. Common Core is NOT A POLITICAL ISSUE!!! People are not expressing opposition to Common Core because they do not know about it!! Once they learn what it is really about, they will be opposed because of what it does to the children. The average or above average student suffers terribly!

    3. Higher education endorses Common Core? Then please explain what the UC system has said that a high school graduate will have to take 2 years of remedial math BEFORE THEY CAN ENTER into the
    UC system due to the lack of education that high school graduates will have under Common Core?

    4. Teachers Unions support Common Core? Really? I know many teachers that are SO OPPOSED TO COMMON CORE THAT THEY ARE RETIRING!!! Teachers have to know that their longevity as a teacher is directly tied to the test results. They have to know that in one district in New York that over 200 teachers were fired in one school year due to poor test results. They have to know that the ultimate goal of Common Core is to have a facilitator in a classroom, not a teacher because all of the childrens learning will be done via a computer. They also have to know that Gov Brown has signed a bill so that teachers no longer have to have a 4 year degree to be a teacher. A person with a 2 year education with a focus on PE can show the 1st grader what to learn. Of course the unions support it…..they will have low paid facilitators that they are collecting dues from to stand in a classroom and make sure the kids turn the computer on.

    CA has invested a tremendous amount of resources in Common Core because the Federal govt wanted their money back if they didn’t. CA has received most of their Common Core stuff from GA who backed out due to the poor education for children.

    People do not believe what you are reading here. Do you research. Teachers are made to sign contracts not to say anything bad. Look into what has happened in other states and get Common Core out of CA!!

    Replies

    • el 2 years ago2 years ago

      I have actually spoken to quite a few teachers, who had no particular reason to be beholden to Common Core, who did not know my opinion of it before I talked with them, who really like the new standards over what they were working with before, and are actively excited about working with them. They like the idea of spending more time going deeper on fewer topics, and they like some of the more interdisciplinary … Read More

      I have actually spoken to quite a few teachers, who had no particular reason to be beholden to Common Core, who did not know my opinion of it before I talked with them, who really like the new standards over what they were working with before, and are actively excited about working with them. They like the idea of spending more time going deeper on fewer topics, and they like some of the more interdisciplinary aspects. Someone I know is using the ideas in an afterschool curriculum that she teaches, and it’s interesting to see how she plays with bringing the ideas in to an elective topic.

      No one of course is excited about the exams, which bring a lot of anxiety to everyone, both in terms of the logistics of administering them and the uncertainty of how they will be constructed and evaluated, plus the whack-em-over-the-head aspect that so many external actors bring to the test results … whatever the results are, the (completely rational) expectation is that they will be used to attack schools and teachers.

      A lot of the reaction is key to “what you were working with before.” So for each state, that’s a different delta.

      The math is going to be challenging, and I am concerned that we are making the transition too quickly and without enough training and preparation. Teachers who have a strong understanding of the depth of mathematics and patterns will be able to see the value in these new approaches and leverage them, but some teachers will probably struggle with the new material because they are used to teaching algorithms instead of patterns. But, the new stuff is very powerful and I think in the end, if it is taught well, has the potential to create much deeper mathematical understanding, understanding that most Americans (and most parents) do not have.

      I hate the political aspect that has forced the transition into an artificially short timeframe. I think there is value in the idea of Common Core but it would have been better leveraged if adopted more organically and a few states at a time.

  37. Cynthia 2 years ago2 years ago

    Why is it that CC was not influenced by early childhood educators? To expect young children to grasp this new curriculum when the front part of their brains have not been fully developed is beyond me. I think you may want to research a lot more before accepting such garbage.

  38. Susan Colby 2 years ago2 years ago

    This native Californian thinks that Common Core is the worst thing to hit this state and the country in generations. Even if the education weren't so bad the data mining and selling the kids information to a third party is nothing short of evil!! This taxpaying California native will be moving out of this state and taking my taxes and kids with me to get a decent education somewhere else!!! How dare … Read More

    This native Californian thinks that Common Core is the worst thing to hit this state and the country in generations. Even if the education weren’t so bad the data mining and selling the kids information to a third party is nothing short of evil!! This taxpaying California native will be moving out of this state and taking my taxes and kids with me to get a decent education somewhere else!!! How dare the Common Core believe that you can tell my 2nd grader whether they will go to college or not and your data probing will push them into a path that YOU decide!!

  39. Carol Threewit 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common Core tests the children over and over. First pretest, introduce, teach and post test. Daily tests, weekly tests, monthly tests and quarterly tests. When will the teachers have time to teach? Dig in…have the children submerge in it?
    If they set other countries such as Finland and Japan for models of countries whom our children are behind…they do not start their children out like this! Figure out what it is….leave our babies alone until then.

  40. Sally Navle 2 years ago2 years ago

    It is not only "Red" states that are opposing Common Core. There is a growing number of Parents and Educators in Washington State that are fighting back. Common Core was designed by people who have zero background in Education. What they are pushing down the throats of Elementary students is unproven, known to be not developmentally appropriate and math that is irrelevant. Children are being tested constantly. One of the worst programs ever rolled out. … Read More

    It is not only “Red” states that are opposing Common Core. There is a growing number of Parents and Educators in Washington State that are fighting back. Common Core was designed by people who have zero background in Education. What they are pushing down the throats of Elementary students is unproven, known to be not developmentally appropriate and math that is irrelevant. Children are being tested constantly. One of the worst programs ever rolled out. Sorry that CA thinks they are doing so well & giving themselves a pat on the back. I find that so sad.

  41. Lelah 2 years ago2 years ago

    Common Core is destroying education. I pity the society we will have when these students are adults in the real world.

  42. Nora 2 years ago2 years ago

    You are very wrong. Common Core is very bad for our kids. If it really was good then why was it forced on us. Why did they not have any of the parents given information and surveys on this way before being forced on everyone. Why is everyone who approved this not have any of their own children in public schools where they will have to be under it. They … Read More

    You are very wrong. Common Core is very bad for our kids. If it really was good then why was it forced on us. Why did they not have any of the parents given information and surveys on this way before being forced on everyone. Why is everyone who approved this not have any of their own children in public schools where they will have to be under it. They all go to fancy private schools. If it is so good then why were the States not allowed to have their own school districts decide if they wanted to implement Common Core in their schools. Why, because it is a political, socialist way of controlling the minds of children just as they do in communist countries. If it is so good then why force it on the schools. They should be lining up on their own if it was really good. It is not. It is a controlling method and a money maker only. They do not care about the children or their education. Educated people will see the lie in this system and the controllers do not want educated, free thinking children they cannot control. That is the whole reasoning behind forcing Common Core on the American people. It is control.

  43. Jinia 2 years ago2 years ago

    With numerous States/counties repelling Common Core, a huge grassroots movement dedicated to cutting Common Core, the abysmal roll out of state assessments aligned with Common Core I can’t image a worse time for such an article. A wonderful place to start intelligent research…

    http://dianeravitch.net/2013/02/26/why-i-cannot-support-the-common-core-standards/

    Please, do your own research. Read what teachers and parents are saying about Common Core. Stopping Common Core before implementation is far easier that getting it out.

  44. cheri kiesecker 2 years ago2 years ago

    Most Americans oppose Common Core. Parents don't like the over testing and the data mining that comes with Cc. Business owners would be wise to look into Common Core further and find it is not internationally competitive, students will leave high school about 2 yrs. behind their international counterparts, requiring more remedial studies to get into college. Parents and teachers were not asked if they wanted common core, or the data mining associated, or the … Read More

    Most Americans oppose Common Core. Parents don’t like the over testing and the data mining that comes with Cc. Business owners would be wise to look into Common Core further and find it is not internationally competitive, students will leave high school about 2 yrs. behind their international counterparts, requiring more remedial studies to get into college. Parents and teachers were not asked if they wanted common core, or the data mining associated, or the PARCC test that puts so much pressure on teachers to TEACH TO IT. If you want to think about the future, keep education local, keep it out of the hands of billionaires and corporations like Pearson who are profiting from Common Core. The only thing rigorous about common core is the advertising $ behind it.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/most-americans-oppose-common-core-standards-poll/
    http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/09/24/protecting-student-privacy-in-online-learning/student-data-collection-is-out-of-control
    http://pioneerinstitute.org/news/lowering-the-bar-how-common-core-math-fails-to-prepare-students-for-stem/
    http://www.dissentmagazine.org/article/got-dough-how-billionaires-rule-our-schools

  45. Concerned Parent 2 years ago2 years ago

    The article is looking state-wide. I'm sure if you went district-by-district throughout the state you would see opposition. In my school district and school, my child's teacher flat-out told the children that she found CCSS Math confusing and said parents cannot help at home with their homework. She is already setting them up with the thinking of "I cannot do this". Perhaps more training and the school district should have looked at other CCSS Math … Read More

    The article is looking state-wide. I’m sure if you went district-by-district throughout the state you would see opposition. In my school district and school, my child’s teacher flat-out told the children that she found CCSS Math confusing and said parents cannot help at home with their homework. She is already setting them up with the thinking of “I cannot do this”. Perhaps more training and the school district should have looked at other CCSS Math & Language Arts before deciding on using Engage New York. I believe test scores are going to be interesting. Our school has always had high scores but with teachers feeling confused/unprepared to teach CCSS I have a feeling that scores will drop dramatically.

  46. Meg Norris 2 years ago2 years ago

    listen to what parents, teachers and mental health professionals are saying about CC. http://vimeo.com/m/108856538

  47. Paul Muench 2 years ago2 years ago

    Just a reminder that the Common Core State Standards are one definition of what it means to be college and career ready. The creators of the standards never claimed that the standards were the means to college and career readiness. The means have to be determined and funded by the adopting states. It's the means that will either achieve or fail to achieve the defined goal. It just doesn't make sense … Read More

    Just a reminder that the Common Core State Standards are one definition of what it means to be college and career ready. The creators of the standards never claimed that the standards were the means to college and career readiness. The means have to be determined and funded by the adopting states. It’s the means that will either achieve or fail to achieve the defined goal. It just doesn’t make sense to say that the goal will achieve the goal. Why is this important? Because the Fordham Foundation, a strong supporter of CCSS, evaluated California’s prior education standards to be on par with CCSS. Which suggests that California primarily has, and had, a means problem and not a goal problem.

    Will we ever be able to determine the impact of the CCSS? I suppose if we get to a point that a significant number of students are meeting the standards and not competing with students from other states and countries we could say the standards were too low. I suppose if a significant number of students are failing to meet the standards, but still living productive and happy lives then we could say the standards were too high. I don’t know the numbers but I know some people think we’ve already covered the latter case.

  48. Dr. Ernie Zarra 2 years ago2 years ago

    As a California educator, author, and an adjunct professor of education, there are a few items that need clarification and even correction in this piece. I do so in my upcoming book on Common Core, due to be released in Spring 2015. Suffice that I can assure the readers the author's Common Core apologetic is not all roses here in California. In fact, he makes a serious error in concluding that teacher's … Read More

    As a California educator, author, and an adjunct professor of education, there are a few items that need clarification and even correction in this piece. I do so in my upcoming book on Common Core, due to be released in Spring 2015. Suffice that I can assure the readers the author’s Common Core apologetic is not all roses here in California. In fact, he makes a serious error in concluding that teacher’s unions, whose administrators to support Democratic policy, have the support of all teachers in that union. We all know what leadership decides is communicated as “Teachers support . . .” Nothing can be farther from the truth. Teachers are just too busy trying to implement the Common Core and are exhausted from the change. They are exhausted because they were sold a bill of goods and the expectations are not realistic. They are frustrated because people with no classroom experience have decided what is best in the classroom. They are angry that there is no research base to justify a change in education paradigm. They are unable to implement Common Core because it is not realistic. Be assured that the majority of teachers are extremely frustrated with Common Core. I hear it daily from my wife and her public school colleagues. I hear it daily from teachers across the nation.

    Parents are not in favor of the Common Core. About 3 million Republican voters are not in favor of it. The author does not mention Obama’s Race to the Top program and its “carrots with requirements” to states seeking waivers from NCLB. He also does not connect the RTTP and Common Core State Standards. So, ask yourself why California teachers are so dead-set against evaluations tying their employment to performance? California is a mess, and the implementation of Common Core will be another example of the federal government overreach. NCLB was not a great success. Common Core is even worse.

  49. John 2 years ago2 years ago

    To learn why CC is not good for our students or our country from a pedagogical view watch this 54 minute teacher created video.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w4xD7nzLD8&feature=youtu.be
    This is probably the best and most thoroughly researched anti-Common Core presentation to date.

  50. Don 2 years ago2 years ago

    I cannot fault this article's purpose for spotlighting the widespread endorsement of Common Core, however what evidence do we have to indicate the actual implementation of CC instruction is on track as we head to the testing of it this spring? There isn't an iota of evidence presented to indicate that we are ready as a state. Is there any statewide tracking that measures the roll out district by district? For example, I've … Read More

    I cannot fault this article’s purpose for spotlighting the widespread endorsement of Common Core, however what evidence do we have to indicate the actual implementation of CC instruction is on track as we head to the testing of it this spring? There isn’t an iota of evidence presented to indicate that we are ready as a state. Is there any statewide tracking that measures the roll out district by district? For example, I’ve heard very little about it here in San Francisco and I’m not aware of any significant changes to my children’s instruction.The hype meter is spiking and I have serious doubts whether all this support amounts down to a hill of beans.

    Gary, OK, so Tressy doesn’t have her details straight about Common Core, but lighten up. I hope it wasn’t customary for you to insult your students for their religious beliefs.

  51. A Norton 2 years ago2 years ago

    The only reason that there is not as strong of a voice in opposition to Common Core in California is because the full roll-out only started this school year. There are many parents who knew how awful it was before it started in our state, and many are now finally waking up to the harsh reality of how awful the standards truly are because they are seeing terrible worksheets and homework coming home. The opposition … Read More

    The only reason that there is not as strong of a voice in opposition to Common Core in California is because the full roll-out only started this school year. There are many parents who knew how awful it was before it started in our state, and many are now finally waking up to the harsh reality of how awful the standards truly are because they are seeing terrible worksheets and homework coming home. The opposition took a long time in New York to build and that will happen here, but it will happen. We will do everything in our power to put back in to place the superior standards that were there before we bought in to this whole debacle. “California’s standards could well serve as a model for internationally com­petitive national standards. They are explicit, clear, and cover the essential topics for rigorous mathematics instruction. The introduction for the stan­dards is notable for providing excellent and clear guidance on mathematics education.” Fordham Institute

  52. Ly Kou 2 years ago2 years ago

    Please watch the Chilling Truth about Common Core by Dr. Duke Pesta. Ffind out why parents and educators across our nation are rejecting Common Core.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Si-kx5-MKSE

    Replies

    • B Maynard 2 years ago2 years ago

      Yes! Dr. Pesta is right on. I highly recommend his video!

  53. Tressy Capps 2 years ago2 years ago

    9. California is one of the poorest performing states in the the nation. Lowering the bar to meet these abyssmal standards works for California educators. I take exception to Item 2. Untrue. KFI am640 radio show host Bill Carroll just yesterday discussed the fight in Orange County against these terrible standards. There is an event tomorrow Dr Pesta is a professor of English at the University of Wisconson, Oshkosh and the academic director … Read More

    9. California is one of the poorest performing states in the the nation. Lowering the bar to meet these abyssmal standards works for California educators. I take exception to Item 2. Untrue. KFI am640 radio show host Bill Carroll just yesterday discussed the fight in Orange County against these terrible standards. There is an event tomorrow Dr Pesta is a professor of English at the University of Wisconson, Oshkosh and the academic director of the Freedom Project Education. He will be discussing the Common Core Science and History Standards; updating us on efforts to remove Common Core from state to state and offering some perspective on the best ways to push back against their manipulation on our children.

    When: Sat. October 18th, 7pm

    Where: Living Truth Christian Fellowship
    1114 W. Ontario Ave.
    Corona, CA 92882

    Everyone is invited. Please share with friends and family.

    Replies

    • Gary Ravani 2 years ago2 years ago

      Strange stuff going on in Orange County is hardly news. Here's a news cash you can bring to your "esteemed" speaker: There are no Common Core science and history standards. Common Core covers only math and English language Arts. There are Next Generation Science Standards, and they do actually deal with science rather than people's religious fables and I imagine that's why they might become a target. The state of CA is in the process of … Read More

      Strange stuff going on in Orange County is hardly news.

      Here’s a news cash you can bring to your “esteemed” speaker: There are no Common Core science and history standards. Common Core covers only math and English language Arts. There are Next Generation Science Standards, and they do actually deal with science rather than people’s religious fables and I imagine that’s why they might become a target. The state of CA is in the process of revising its Social Studies Framework, but there is no particular alignment to any “national ” trends I am aware of.

      • A Norton 2 years ago2 years ago

        I am sorry, Gary, but you are quite mistaken. The Next Generation Science Standards are just Common Core with a new name since the name Common Core is now poison. Also, the Advance Placement U.S. History standards and tests are now changed by, you guessed it, the same authors of the horrible Common Core State Standards. Physical Education has even changed to be CC aligned as the ELA standards are meant to touch EVERY subject, including Math.

      • Kelly Schafer 2 years ago2 years ago

        Maybe you should go hear Dr. Pesta speak, or look up one of his speeches on youtube. I was at his event in Carlsbad, CA, last week. Indeed, the Next Generation science standards ARE Common Core, but rebranded because of the backlash against CCSS. I really think you should listen to Dr. Pesta. Everything he speaks about is documented, not his opinion. And if you go to his site, you can find … Read More

        Maybe you should go hear Dr. Pesta speak, or look up one of his speeches on youtube. I was at his event in Carlsbad, CA, last week. Indeed, the Next Generation science standards ARE Common Core, but rebranded because of the backlash against CCSS. I really think you should listen to Dr. Pesta. Everything he speaks about is documented, not his opinion. And if you go to his site, you can find all the source material for every statement that he makes.

      • B Maynard 2 years ago2 years ago

        What you are aware of and what the truth is are two different things. Ca. has adopted "Integrated Science" Standards. It's like integrated math...a little of everything with no real understanding of a specific subject. This means chemistry, biology and physics are lumped together and not able to be attained for a stem ready college straight out of high school. That is what has happened with the math. Attacking someone by saying they believe in … Read More

        What you are aware of and what the truth is are two different things. Ca. has adopted “Integrated Science” Standards. It’s like integrated math…a little of everything with no real understanding of a specific subject. This means chemistry, biology and physics are lumped together and not able to be attained for a stem ready college straight out of high school. That is what has happened with the math. Attacking someone by saying they believe in fables just because a meeting is able to be held in a room at a church instead of Elks’ Lodge is assumptive and ignorant at best. Try to leave emotion out of comments; you will sound more credible.

      • el 2 years ago2 years ago

        To be fair, Gary, while the main Common Core group may only be developing math and english language arts standards, I have on my desk a document with the Long Beach Unified School District logo a document that alleges to be "Common Core State Standards K-12 Technology Skills Scope and Sequence." If you dig in to it, it claims to be based on something that Fresno put out and then it will say it is … Read More

        To be fair, Gary, while the main Common Core group may only be developing math and english language arts standards, I have on my desk a document with the Long Beach Unified School District logo a document that alleges to be “Common Core State Standards K-12 Technology Skills Scope and Sequence.” If you dig in to it, it claims to be based on something that Fresno put out and then it will say it is “aligned” to the ELA and mathematics Common Core standards. Any rational, reasonable person holding this document would think it was national Common Core.

        (My personal favorite part of this document is the suggestion that 3rd graders will have “mastered” “Fair Use Guidelines”. Considering the extent that determining “Fair Use” is an active area of law that real lawyers and courts still wrangle, it seems likely to me that the person who wrote that maybe hasn’t truly mastered “Fair Use” law just yet. Maybe what they meant to write was a much more generic statement about appropriate use of other people’s work, both in and out of copyright; after all, it’s not cool to turn in pre-1915 text with your name on it, either.)

        • Gary Ravani 2 years ago2 years ago

          Point taken in a general sense , El; however, in the context above I had a different point in mind. The speaker mentioned in the post, Duke Pesta, is a "fellow" at the Heartland Institute, a right wing "think tank" [sic] funded by the Koch brothers and aligned with ALEC. Their agenda is to discredit climate science and, so, just about any actual science. The climate part is clearly aligned with the Koch's resistance to … Read More

          Point taken in a general sense , El; however, in the context above I had a different point in mind. The speaker mentioned in the post, Duke Pesta, is a “fellow” at the Heartland Institute, a right wing “think tank” [sic] funded by the Koch brothers and aligned with ALEC. Their agenda is to discredit climate science and, so, just about any actual science. The climate part is clearly aligned with the Koch’s resistance to anything that questions the continued “wisdom” of dumping huge amounts of carbon into the atmosphere and that could possibly undermine their business interests. Heartland gins up fervor in the hyper-consrvative base by emphasizing the “critical thinking” aspects of CCSS and NGSS and its potential to create thinking people who may no longer be conservative enough. No doubt from a certain perspective that’s a legitimate concern. The charge of CCSS being somehow” subversive” is not uncommon from the right.

          From the left we have a number of concerns. The most fervent one is the linked-at-the-hip relationship of CCSS and the new testing systems. If the continued overemphasis on high stakes testing continues with CCSS and SBAC in this state you may well see a upsurge in teachers’ resistance. The amount of resistance to CCSS surged in NY when implementation of the standards and the tests was rushed, severely under resourced, and seemingly pointed at targeting schools and teachers as failing.

          My own perspective on CCSS is something I’ve explained as being about the good, the bad, and the ugly.

          The good is, many (but definitely not all) teachers who’ve done some work with CCSS have a positive take on them. They are less the “laundry list” of skills found in the old standards and there is more emphasis on depth and thinking. There is more room in them for a teacher’s instructional discretion.

          The bad is the potential for linkage to over-testing and all of the damage well cited by the National Research Council in its study of standards and test based “accountability,” or “incentives” as the NRC puts it. With Governor Brown, the current State Board, and Tom Torlakson as SPI these kind of major mistakes are less likely to occur in CA, but the possibility is always there.

          The ugly, is that the CCSS were driven by Gates funding (never a good thing), and developed under the auspices of the Governors and State Superintendents, but practically by publishing company employees and some university types and mostly lacking in much transparency. There was no direct input from actual classroom teachers. When the first “draft” was presented the two national teachers’ unions objected and teachers were invited to have “input.” I know people who were involved in the process and they suggest the “input” was included in the final draft “to some extent.”

          I have never been impressed with the first round of standards and am still not sure why the US, as opposed to some other school systems, is so wedded to them. But, oh well. Let’s hope for the best.

          • el 2 years ago2 years ago

            I think you and I have a pretty similar reaction to Common Core, Gary. Thanks for the background on Duke Pesta. It seems that New York had an especially terrible rollout of Common Core, both in terms of stupidly designed curriculum and stupidly designed testing. Another thing I note about these "Technology Standards" I have on my desk is that they are expecting proper touch-typing keyboarding skills of 2nd graders... specifically, if you dig in, not because … Read More

            I think you and I have a pretty similar reaction to Common Core, Gary. Thanks for the background on Duke Pesta.

            It seems that New York had an especially terrible rollout of Common Core, both in terms of stupidly designed curriculum and stupidly designed testing.

            Another thing I note about these “Technology Standards” I have on my desk is that they are expecting proper touch-typing keyboarding skills of 2nd graders… specifically, if you dig in, not because they think that is developmentally appropriate, but because that’s what’s needed to take the online tests, someone thinks.

            IME… I don’t think second grade hands are large enough to hit the keys that way, but I could be wrong. I have been searching for some actual expert opinions on when touch-typing should be taught, and am very interested in figuring out when it should be shoehorned into the educational path in our district. I learned it in High School via a dedicated semester elective… you know, because girls needed to be able to type in case they needed to work as secretaries.

            (Little did they know that touch-typing would be key to a successful STEM career…)

    • B Maynard 2 years ago2 years ago

      Awesome. Keep up the good work. Fellow fighter here in San Diego County! summerglennacademy.com has our presentation schedules for this area under the Common Core tab if you know anyone down in this area that is interested in the truth about common core!

  54. Bruce William Smith 2 years ago2 years ago

    Reason 4 above is interesting and deserves comment. California has found an alternative means of getting away from No Child Left Behind, and Governor Brown and other leaders deserve real credit for not succumbing to the federal education department's ill-conceived doubling down on the test-and-punish strategy that is embodied in the waivers that have diminished public confidence in state education systems in other parts of the country. But that doesn't mean Common Core will work … Read More

    Reason 4 above is interesting and deserves comment. California has found an alternative means of getting away from No Child Left Behind, and Governor Brown and other leaders deserve real credit for not succumbing to the federal education department’s ill-conceived doubling down on the test-and-punish strategy that is embodied in the waivers that have diminished public confidence in state education systems in other parts of the country. But that doesn’t mean Common Core will work as intended. Its mathematics standards will still leave American students 2-3 years behind their peers among leading nations in Asia and Europe, and while its English Language Arts standards are better conceived, they are not especially competitive in high school, at least for students who wish to pursue literary studies in highly selective university colleges, for whom supplementation and accelerated progress through them are needed; but these enhancements are manageable, whereas the grade-by-grade progression through the mathematics standards is completely uncompetitive and must be revised from scratch, which is perfectly apparent to anyone who has spent years comparing performance standards in mathematics and other subjects around the world.

    Replies

    • Gary Ravani 2 years ago2 years ago

      There still remains no known relationship between an economies functioning and competitiveness and comparisons with other nations, usually done via international test scores. The US has had middling test scores for decades and the #1 performing economy in the word for most of that same period. The US dropped from the #1 spot because of the misfeasance and malfeasance of the financial sector, but is rising again. The same ranking of the US's competitiveness also ranks … Read More

      There still remains no known relationship between an economies functioning and competitiveness and comparisons with other nations, usually done via international test scores. The US has had middling test scores for decades and the #1 performing economy in the word for most of that same period. The US dropped from the #1 spot because of the misfeasance and malfeasance of the financial sector, but is rising again.

      The same ranking of the US’s competitiveness also ranks the schools, except the universities, as “middling” which has been the case whatever the rankings (#1 or #7) of the economy as a whole. The only time the WEF, which does the rankings, actually mentioned US education (that I am aware of) in its narratives, it noted that the US does not spend enough on elementary education relative to what it spends on university education. Which may account for why our universities are so highly rated and other levels not so much. Of course, the other reason is the wealthier you are the more chance you have of getting to a university in the first place and so the more public funding is expended. This should be ironic, but isn’t.

      It is unclear what you mean by a lack of “competitiveness” in the Common Core. The US doesn’t do as good a job with English Language Arts as the Finns or Koreans? That would be odd.

      If it’s just the concept of “competitive” and the principles of ‘incentives” driving education, the National Research Council did a pretty good job of debunking that. And that can be found here: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12521. The NRC found that test score driven, incentive based education “reform,” not only did not do what it was intended to do (or so it was claimed), raise test scores, it demeaned education as a whole by narrowing the curriculum to math and reading and neglecting other important content. Whatever the possible benefits of CCSS and the new testing systems we will have to guard carefully against that happening again.

      • Bruce William Smith 2 years ago2 years ago

        My comment refers to the competitiveness of the Common Core standards, not that of the American vs. other economies, so most of your reply is beside the point, from my perspective. Students compete to get into university colleges, and those who have been taught substandard curricula based on underchallenging standards are at a distinct disadvantage in that competition, and may need to spend thousands of dollars and years in tertiary education to learn what more … Read More

        My comment refers to the competitiveness of the Common Core standards, not that of the American vs. other economies, so most of your reply is beside the point, from my perspective. Students compete to get into university colleges, and those who have been taught substandard curricula based on underchallenging standards are at a distinct disadvantage in that competition, and may need to spend thousands of dollars and years in tertiary education to learn what more students in more rigourous systems learn for free at public expense during secondary education.

        My comment on the Common Core’s English Language Arts standards does not refer to the Finns or the Koreans, and it’s obvious you’re not trying very hard at this point to understand my point, but instead are looking for some kind of cheap opportunity to score a debating point; but you fail in this instance, since the language arts standards of the Finns, Koreans, and other nations that use a language of instruction other than English are amenable to comparison with the Common Core’s language arts standards. I have done the comparison, but do not find the result very enlightening, since those two languages are minor world languages that don’t compare in their influence or in the extent of their literature with English.

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