Updated June 1. As a high school student, Coley Baker found a “dream school” in Biola University, an evangelical Christian college with a palm-tree-dotted campus close yet not too close to home in Los Angeles County. But things happen in late adolescence – identity takes shape, feelings emerge – and by the 2014 Biola graduation ceremony, the young Christian woman Baker once appeared to be had spent two years hiding a new identity as a young Christian transgender man.

“I went into Biola not fully being sure that I was transgender,” said Baker, now 23. “Over the course of my time there, I became more certain.”

Baker never came out publicly about his transgender identity on campus. But at about the same time — in response to signals from the federal government that transgender K-12 students should be protected under anti-discrimination laws — Biola decided to apply for a religious exemption that would give the university the right to expel transgender students and refuse to admit, house or accommodate them, without jeopardizing federal funding. Now a California bill is attempting to curb, at a state level, California’s own practice of granting private colleges religious exemptions that allow them to discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students in admissions, housing and campus activities. The state currently gives a blanket exemption to the anti-discrimination provisions of the Equity in Higher Education Act to all colleges that are “controlled by a religious organization.”

Senate Bill 1146, by Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, would shrink the number of religious colleges that qualify for religious exemptions. Also under SB 1146, colleges that receive federal religious exemptions would be required to publicize that fact to prospective students. Another bill, Assembly Bill 1888, by Assemblyman Evan Low, D-Campbell, failed to move out of committee. That bill proposed that the state withhold Cal Grant funding eligibility for colleges that violate state nondiscrimination laws.

“California should not be using taxpayer money to subsidize colleges that choose to discriminate against LGBT students,” Low said. He called the schools that seek a religious exemption to anti-discrimination laws “the worst of the worst in terms of institutions that discriminate.”

Opponents say that making it more difficult for schools to get a religious exemption is an attempt to force religious colleges to comply with California nondiscrimination laws – which prevent schools from discriminating on the basis of disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race, ethnicity, religion or sexual orientation – that may conflict with their beliefs. Forty-two colleges in California qualify for the state religious exemption, said Dean Broyles, president of the National Center for Law & Policy, an Escondido-based legal organization that advocates on behalf of Christian organizations. He said without religious exemptions, the colleges could face costly discrimination lawsuits.

“Different religious organizations have different beliefs about men and women, homosexuality and transgenderism,” Broyles said.

“People can say, ‘Well, it’s for a good cause, it ends discrimination,’ but if you have different views, can the government tell us all what to think?” he asked. “What if we start adding all kinds of bizarre categories of discrimination? … What if we added 75 or 80 categories of things they couldn’t talk about?”

Under SB 1146, which passed the Senate last week, only colleges that train ministers or theology teachers would qualify for a religious exemption. All others would have to agree not to discriminate.

In opposition to the Senate bill, the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities wrote that the religious exemption “provides long standing protection for religious based education institutions.”

Among the goals of SB 1146, said Jo Michael, legislation manager for Equality California, an advocacy group that is sponsoring both bills, is to let high school seniors know if their prospective college is seeking, or has been granted, the right to discriminate based on gender identity.

A move toward making that information more available came last month when the U.S. Department of Education, under pressure from the Human Rights Campaign, posted on its website a searchable database of colleges that are seeking federal religious exemptions to Title IX.

SB 1146 would go further by requiring colleges to include information about their religious exemption in letters to prospective high school applicants, post on campus the reason for the exemption, discuss the exemption in brochures and talk about the exemption on tours for new students.

Erin Green, a senior at Biola and executive director of Biola Equal Ground, an unofficial LGBT student support group, said it’s a common misconception that students who are LGBT wouldn’t choose to attend an evangelical Christian college.

“Here’s the thing – who’s paying for college?” Green said. “Parents are paying for college and if they’ve grown up in an evangelical environment, a parent is choosing the college. A lot of students have no choice.”

For students who are gay or transgender and deeply connected to their faith, the dissonance they feel on campus is intense, said Jordyn Sun, national student organizer for Soul Force, an advocacy group that works with LGBT students at evangelical Christian colleges.

“This is a Christ-centered university and I have faculty saying they love me, yet I can’t be myself on campus,” said Sun, who graduated in 2014 from Azusa Pacific University, a Christian college in Orange County that has not sought an exemption to Title IX. “I think it does more mental, emotional and spiritual damage to people than anyone realizes.”

The federal religious exemption carries more heft than the state exemption because federal compliance is tied to millions of dollars in federal funding. (See chart below.) At least seven colleges in California – Biola University, Fresno Pacific University, John Paul the Great Catholic University, LABI College, Simpson University, The Master’s College and William Jessup University – and 57 colleges in total nationwide have applied since 2013 for religious exemptions to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as it applies to gender identity, according to a 2015 report from the Human Rights Campaign, a Washington, D.C.-based advocacy group.

In many instances, the requests for religious waivers mention the first indication of the federal government’s intention of protecting transgender K-12 students – a 2013 federal civil rights resolution agreement with the Arcadia Unified School District, according to the Human Rights Campaign.

In Biola’s 2014 letter seeking a federal religious exemption, the university said its biblical beliefs affirm only heterosexual, gender-conforming people and monogamous, married intimate relationships. Biola requested the right to expel transgender students and to refuse to admit, house or accommodate them. The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights responded that Biola does not meet the criteria of being controlled by a religious organization and requested more information. No decision to approve or deny the waiver has yet been announced.

Loma Linda University in 1985 and Pacific Union College in 1990 received religious exemptions to Title IX protections for female students who are pregnant and unmarried. Pepperdine University received a religious exemption to Title IX in 1985 that allowed the college to take disciplinary action against students who were involved in extramarital or same-sex relationships. Earlier this year, Pepperdine asked the Office for Civil Rights to withdraw its religious exemption and remove its name from any list of universities holding Title IX exemptions.

The recent surge in religious exemptions continues a history of religious institutions using their faith as a shield for discrimination, said Geoff Kors, government policy director for the National Center for Lesbian Rights, a San Francisco-based legal advocacy group. “Religious beliefs have been used as grounds for segregation and slavery,” he said. He noted that Bob Jones University, which stated that scripture prohibited interracial dating, refused to admit African-American students until 1970. In 1983, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Bob Jones University was not entitled to tax-exempt status because its practices were contrary to the public policy of eliminating racial discrimination.

Even as Biola seeks the right to discriminate, Baker said, gay or transgender students will always be at the school. “When they show up at Biola, they may be in a place where they’re trying to live as if they are not gay or trans,” he said. “But I think a lot of people can’t live in that mental space for long. It will drive them into so much despair.”

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  1. Mr.H. 1 year ago1 year ago

    Congress shall make no law regarding the free exercise of religion.
    Darwin will stand in denouncement of misuse of parts. No law can cash in , for here is the reality check with two co- signers .

  2. Chuck TELA 1 year ago1 year ago

    Equal Access violates everyone’s civil rights by declaring sex separated restrooms for Males or Females instituted to protect privacy DISCRIMINATORY IN PRINCIPLE on ALL levels regardless simply because it provides that the designation ‘male’ or ‘female’ is not inclusive of the opposite. That is contrary to human nature to declare that the designation FEMALE is DISCRIMINATORY simply because it is not inclusive of male and vice versa.

  3. Emily 1 year ago1 year ago

    Is religious discrimination not as important as gender discrimination? This smells of religious discrimination to me. Ms. Adams, in an effort to present unbiased reporting, please include “religion” or something like unto it as one of your searchable tags.

  4. Daniel Ruiz 1 year ago1 year ago

    The argument was made that mental despair may develop in transgender students. I argue that by attending a good Christian College, a transgender will discover the unconditional love of Christ. God's Love and saving Grace can only foster a relationship that leads to a desire to have a relationship with the creator of all of us and inspire us to please him (our heavenly Father) by following his word as written in the Bible. God … Read More

    The argument was made that mental despair may develop in transgender students. I argue that by attending a good Christian College, a transgender will discover the unconditional love of Christ. God’s Love and saving Grace can only foster a relationship that leads to a desire to have a relationship with the creator of all of us and inspire us to please him (our heavenly Father) by following his word as written in the Bible. God does not discriminate- He transforms.

  5. anita 1 year ago1 year ago

    Why is a person’s sexual preference anyone else’s business?

  6. P Fuentes 1 year ago1 year ago

    Universities should be exempt from accepting any student but only as long as they do not get any state, federal or local government money.
    Not one cent of public money should be spent on any university unless it does not discriminate against anyone. These universities should be places of learning not indoctrination pits.

  7. Bridgett Hollowell 1 year ago1 year ago

    Discrimination is discrimination no matter what form it takes. Also it is time that the colleges stand on their own other than helping the STUDENTS realize their education goals....PERIOD! They should get no more assistance than secular colleges. Americans are tired of being bullied by different religious institutions. The government has no obligation to consider any faith for any reason as we are a nation that embraces the notion of the separation of church and state. I … Read More

    Discrimination is discrimination no matter what form it takes. Also it is time that the colleges stand on their own other than helping the STUDENTS realize their education goals….PERIOD!

    They should get no more assistance than secular colleges. Americans are tired of being bullied by different religious institutions. The government has no obligation to consider any faith for any reason as we are a nation that embraces the notion of the separation of church and state.

    I feel this bill will be passed resoundingly in both houses….thank goodness.

    Replies

    • Aaron Jones 1 year ago1 year ago

      Yes, Separation of Church and State, meaning the government has no legal right to interfere with the religious expression or beliefs of PRIVATE colleges and universities. Go to a state school or another private school, if you don’t like it! Not everyone is going to agree with you. That is part of the democratic process.

  8. Sean Boon 1 year ago1 year ago

    So, If you are transgender you get to tell religious organizations how to practice their faith? How about this. Christian churchs should start forcing all people to go to their services! Wait, no, is that not ok!? Here is a better idea. Don’t go to schools that don’t line up with your principles. If you want to go to schools that foster liberal endoctrination go to public schools and leave the Christians alone.

  9. Elaine Elsayed 1 year ago1 year ago

    Do Islamic colleges get the exemption?
    If private Christian colleges offer majors in pastoral and missionary training similar to Bible colleges, maybe they could still get the exemption.
    Will be praying for you guys!
    It looks like the homeschooling movement might be including colleges as well in the next decade if this discrimination continues.

  10. Michael Dowling 1 year ago1 year ago

    Under the Constitution, Freedom of assembly and Freedom of religion are above these attempts at gagging biblical admonitions for Christians not to “practice” or “condone” homosexuality in any form. Time for Christians to dump all these and 501c type exemptions; they do not need Democrats’ permission to teach the Bible or preach the Gospel.

  11. Christina Ihle 1 year ago1 year ago

    It seems simple to me. This law doesn't discriminate against any university from following their religious beliefs, it just says if those beliefs are not in line with state or federal law, that the university doesn't get federal or state monies. This isn't about rights, it's about the money. Federal and state money. Yes, it would be nice if the federal and state money could pay for whatever we want, but … Read More

    It seems simple to me. This law doesn’t discriminate against any university from following their religious beliefs, it just says if those beliefs are not in line with state or federal law, that the university doesn’t get federal or state monies.

    This isn’t about rights, it’s about the money. Federal and state money. Yes, it would be nice if the federal and state money could pay for whatever we want, but that isn’t how it works. But, as individuals, we can spend our money on anything we want. If you want what you want, you will find the money and not depend on government to pay for it.

    Life isn’t fair for a lot of people and how we see it is often through our own lens and not real life. I say, get over it. Religious freedom, which we ALL have a right to is not being challenged here. The government just isn’t paying to keep your religious freedom. And yes, I am a bible believing Christian and proud of it. I just don’t expect the world, or my government to support my beliefs or help me financially to go to any private Christian school.

    Replies

    • M. Johnson 1 year ago1 year ago

      Ms. Ihle, You raise a good point that these laws at this point result in restricting the availability of federal and state funds. However, have you considered that the law also severely limits the state government's definition of what "kind" of faith-based school can even be granted a religious exemption? Without these constitutionally-enshrined protections, the next step will inevitably be lawsuits that are specifically designed to strong-arm and ultimately financially cripple these schools because they … Read More

      Ms. Ihle,

      You raise a good point that these laws at this point result in restricting the availability of federal and state funds. However, have you considered that the law also severely limits the state government’s definition of what “kind” of faith-based school can even be granted a religious exemption? Without these constitutionally-enshrined protections, the next step will inevitably be lawsuits that are specifically designed to strong-arm and ultimately financially cripple these schools because they practice faith standards that many other citizens disagree with, so it’s not just about money. It stems from an outrage from other groups who demand that faith-based organizations publicly accept and approve of their differing values or they will weaponize the state against them.

      Second, you point out that “the government just isn’t paying to keep your religious freedom.” However, have you considered that faith-based people pay the SAME state and federal taxes as the rest of the population? A large portion of these taxes are used by the state for purposes that grieve the conscience of many faith-based citizens, yet they have no recourse in how these funds are used. If the government is going to take the money of faith-based citizens, then similarly faith-based schools shouldn’t be cut off from those funding opportunities.

      Lastly, I agree with you that a Christian school receiving state funding is not a right given to it in the Bible. HOWEVER, I would argue that it is a right protected by the US Constitution, so while we still have that legal protection, we should appeal to it when the same government tries to take it away.

      • John Corona 1 year ago1 year ago

        Beautifully iterated, I recommend that this comment be published under every article opposing Senate Bill 1446.

    • Aaron Jones 1 year ago1 year ago

      Who pays in that State and Federal money, Christina? Millions of people of faith. That’s why I’m voting against more and more governmental control by a minority
      of people who think THEY know what is best for the rest of us.

  12. Michael A. Longinow, Ph.D 1 year ago1 year ago

    This article is inaccurate in its discussion of Biola University’s Title IX request and, in particular, its claim that this university seeks to expel students based on sexual orientation. It also completely misses the notion of religious conscience and the role of diverse religious perspective (lived out in lifestyles that diverge based on faith perspective) in the growth and development of higher education in this country.

    Replies

    • Jane Meredith Adams 1 year ago1 year ago

      Hi Michael. Biola’s Title IX exemption request, which you can find through the link in the table at the end of the article, states: “In keeping with our biblical beliefs concerning the morality of such actions. we cannot in good conscience support or encourage an individual to live in conflict with biblical principles. Moreover, any individual who violates Biola’s Standards of Conduct is subject to discipline, including possible dismissal from the university.”
      Jane

  13. Kelly 1 year ago1 year ago

    As a Bible believing follower of Christ, I went to one of these colleges that are applying for exemption. This bill would take away my religious liberty because if the school did not comply with the government's definition of sexuality, it could be subjected to lawsuits. I have read comments on here that have compared "discrimination" of LGBT students with racial discrimination. That's like comparing apples & oranges. They are totally … Read More

    As a Bible believing follower of Christ, I went to one of these colleges that are applying for exemption. This bill would take away my religious liberty because if the school did not comply with the government’s definition of sexuality, it could be subjected to lawsuits. I have read comments on here that have compared “discrimination” of LGBT students with racial discrimination. That’s like comparing apples & oranges. They are totally different issues. The Bible clearly teaches that God loves all people no matter what race they are. And He loves homosexual people. But when it comes to our sexuality, it defines the sexual “actions” of adultery, premarital sex, & homosexuality to be sinful. At the school that I went to, one of my good friends was a lesbian student. She went to the school because she is a follower of Christ & wants to follow his ways. Being there helped her abstain from the sexual acts because that is what she wanted to do. As Americans, we have a constitutional right to be able to learn about & express aspects of our faith. It scares me when the government tries to think for me & dictate what I can believe or not. Ultimately, as foolish as it sounds to most people, Jesus Christ is the One who will hold is accountable. Did you trust in Him as your Lord & Savior, or did you not?

  14. James trimmer 1 year ago1 year ago

    Another step in taking away our freedoms because of political correctness. They have no right in interfering with religious freedoms from our Chistian schools. If this passes what’s to stop them from legislate our curriculum.

  15. Michael 1 year ago1 year ago

    If you want to discriminate, then it is simple you will not get public money. It's time to stop religious institutions from using their beliefs as a cover to discriminate. If your school will suffer financially then use those prayer classes and pray for money from God since you follow his laws first. You must follow secular laws for secular money and pray for money for religious money. Religions should not have any tax … Read More

    If you want to discriminate, then it is simple you will not get public money. It’s time to stop religious institutions from using their beliefs as a cover to discriminate. If your school will suffer financially then use those prayer classes and pray for money from God since you follow his laws first. You must follow secular laws for secular money and pray for money for religious money. Religions should not have any tax exemptions since it is a normal business and is not special.

  16. Kristen 1 year ago1 year ago

    My daughter attends a faith-based California university. She is a top honors student and award-winning musician who was accepted and offered scholarships at numerous top schools nation-wide, but chose her college not only because of its stellar academic programs, but because she wanted to attend one of the few solid, faith-based universities left in our country. When touring schools, we found the majority had policies and teachings that she felt would be in conflict … Read More

    My daughter attends a faith-based California university. She is a top honors student and award-winning musician who was accepted and offered scholarships at numerous top schools nation-wide, but chose her college not only because of its stellar academic programs, but because she wanted to attend one of the few solid, faith-based universities left in our country.

    When touring schools, we found the majority had policies and teachings that she felt would be in conflict with her faith. I am an adjunct faculty member at a state university and have seen how the values of students of faith are often mocked and undermined by secular institutions. Faith-based schools provide an alternative for students who wish to receive a quality education while having their religious beliefs supported. Her 1st Amendment right guarantees her this protection. SB1146 violates religious freedom and will harm students such as her who have purposely chosen
    such schools.

    The faith-based schools in question do not hide their faith-based policies and values. All students and faculty know what the schools believe and agree to abide by those policies before they commit to the universities. In fact, the majority of students and staff choose such schools because of these policies. When touring schools, my daughter encountered colleges that offered only coed dorms, had teaching in required courses that were contrary to her values, etc. and felt such aspects would be a compromise to her personal religious values. She did not demand that the schools make changes in polices, rather she sought an option more in keeping with her values. Forcing faith-based schools to change their policies will rob students like her from this choice.

    Furthermore, forcing faith-based schools to aggressively publicize that they “discriminate” based on holding to their beliefs or be subject to lawsuits or lose the ability to apply taxpayer funds amounts to blackmail. That is a very loaded and offensive term for an organization that is simply holding to traditional religious values. My daughter does not receive any governmental financial assistance, but we pay taxes that surely go to public universities that don’t support our values. We support all students’ choices in schooling and students who choose religious institutions for higher education should have that same support. Faith-based strive to be kind and loving to all, but kindness does not require full acceptance of all practices or beliefs when those beliefs are in conflict with strongly held religious teachings. Working for a public university, I can attest that secular schools are often aggressively intolerant of students of faith. SB1146 will effectively remove the one safe option that remains for students of faith, many options exist for those who disagree.

  17. Steve 1 year ago1 year ago

    One issue that needs to be integrated into this discussion is that there are students who identify LGBT and who are conservative Christians who want to be at institutions which support their decision to remain celibate and/or maintain their initial gender identity. In other words, if I am a gay Christian committed to abstaining from an actively gay lifestyle, I may want to be at these sorts of schools which have a culture that supports … Read More

    One issue that needs to be integrated into this discussion is that there are students who identify LGBT and who are conservative Christians who want to be at institutions which support their decision to remain celibate and/or maintain their initial gender identity. In other words, if I am a gay Christian committed to abstaining from an actively gay lifestyle, I may want to be at these sorts of schools which have a culture that supports that choice. Similarly for the transgender person. There are plenty of schools to go to if you want to freely express your LGBT identity without any moral strictures, but some students want schools that will assist them in maintaining a different ethical standard. This is the same reason why non-married, heterosexual students choose these sorts of schools that disallow heterosexual activity outside of marriage.

    Replies

    • Emily 1 year ago1 year ago

      Thanks for raising this viewpoint, Steve. It needs to be talked about more but often times seems smothered into silence by the media and the LGBT community. I whole heartedly agree that this needa to be integrated into the discussion.

  18. Lisa 1 year ago1 year ago

    While this may seem to alleviate discrimination for the LGTBQ community, the bill also restricts Christians from obtaining a faith-infused education by restricting their right to use grant monies to attend a faith-based university. And though I do not believe that my religious beliefs should be imposed on others, I also believe that those who wish to attend a university such as FPU or Vanguard or Biola, whose long and deeply held religious beliefs … Read More

    While this may seem to alleviate discrimination for the LGTBQ community, the bill also restricts Christians from obtaining a faith-infused education by restricting their right to use grant monies to attend a faith-based university. And though I do not believe that my religious beliefs should be imposed on others, I also believe that those who wish to attend a university such as FPU or Vanguard or Biola, whose long and deeply held religious beliefs impact hiring protocols, should not be punished for their beliefs. This would prohibit many first generation college students from attending the college of their choice, because it would restrict where their state grant monies could be spent. Even though you may not agree with my religious views, I should still have the right to express them just like everyone else. As a liberal who believes in American Civil Rights, I also believe that as a Christian, I am called to behave in a certain way, regardless of how the world behaves. Understand that I do not expect you to agree and follow my convictions, even as I hope you do not expect me to follow yours.

    Replies

    • Judy Lewis 1 year ago1 year ago

      Can I share your comment with my state Assembly member? That is exactly what I want to say.

  19. Charles 1 year ago1 year ago

    "Here's the thing--who's paying for college?" Green said. “Parents are paying for college and if they’ve grown up in an evangelical environment, a parent is choosing the college. A lot of students have no choice.” Except, nope, you always have a choice. I joined the Army to pay for college, my wife took out student loans. There is a ton of financial aide out there. Some people even choose to work through school. You always have … Read More

    “Here’s the thing–who’s paying for college?” Green said. “Parents are paying for college and if they’ve grown up in an evangelical environment, a parent is choosing the college. A lot of students have no choice.”

    Except, nope, you always have a choice. I joined the Army to pay for college, my wife took out student loans. There is a ton of financial aide out there. Some people even choose to work through school. You always have a choice. If you are truly so principled about your, or someone else’s, gay/lesbian/transgender identity, go somewhere that embraces that. You’ll figure out how.

    Replies

    • Kristen 1 year ago1 year ago

      I seriously doubt that many students are attending $40,000+ private schools because their parents forced them to. Ms. Green is actually employed by a pro LBGT group, Campus Pride, which purposes to aggressively fight against policies at schools they have deemed discriminatory. I've noticed that any who disagrees with her view is painted as intolerant and hateful. Also, if these young adults are mature enough to act on their sexuality, they should be mature enough … Read More

      I seriously doubt that many students are attending $40,000+ private schools because their parents forced them to. Ms. Green is actually employed by a pro LBGT group, Campus Pride, which purposes to aggressively fight against policies at schools they have deemed discriminatory. I’ve noticed that any who disagrees with her view is painted as intolerant and hateful. Also, if these young adults are mature enough to act on their sexuality, they should be mature enough to discuss it with their parents. That’s a red herring.

  20. Caleb 1 year ago1 year ago

    I'm seeing a lot of claims going around that this bill would do far more than just strengthen anti-sex discrimination laws, and I'm not sure how much is actually true. The most clear case I can point to is from Biola, which includes 5 examples of purported effects (bulleted): http://now.biola.edu/news/article/2016/jun/08/preserve-faith-based-higher-education/ As far as I can gather from the bill (http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160SB1146) and the Equity in Higher Education act, which it amends (http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billCompareClient.xhtml?bill_id=200920100SB195), I see no way in which these … Read More

    I’m seeing a lot of claims going around that this bill would do far more than just strengthen anti-sex discrimination laws, and I’m not sure how much is actually true.

    The most clear case I can point to is from Biola, which includes 5 examples of purported effects (bulleted):
    http://now.biola.edu/news/article/2016/jun/08/preserve-faith-based-higher-education/

    As far as I can gather from the bill (http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160SB1146) and the Equity in Higher Education act, which it amends (http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billCompareClient.xhtml?bill_id=200920100SB195), I see no way in which these sorts of claims can be true, with the possible exception of the profession of faith claim (if something about sexuality is included in the profession of faith, I could see how that could risk a violation).

    Is there any merit to these purported effects and others like them? Help!

    Replies

    • Jane Meredith Adams 1 year ago1 year ago

      Hi Caleb.
      I would agree with you. In my reporting, I asked about those claims and received no answer that substantiated them. Jane

    • Aaron 1 year ago1 year ago

      What claims are your specifically talking about? From http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160SB1146: "This bill would limit the religious exemption from the Equity in Higher Education Act to certain educational programs and activities of a postsecondary educational institution that is controlled by a religious organization." The bill basically says you can no longer get an exemption to the Equity in Higher Education Act except for programs training professionals in the sponsoring religion. So anything else (students and staff for non-religious training, … Read More

      What claims are your specifically talking about?

      From http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160SB1146:

      “This bill would limit the religious exemption from the Equity in Higher Education Act to certain educational programs and activities of a postsecondary educational institution that is controlled by a religious organization.”

      The bill basically says you can no longer get an exemption to the Equity in Higher Education Act except for programs training professionals in the sponsoring religion. So anything else (students and staff for non-religious training, bathrooms, dorms, school discipline, etc) would be subject to the Equity in Higher Education Act meaning all Californian institutions that are sometimes called Christian Liberal Arts schools would be forced to take direction on sexual morality from the state government and/or activists with the time/money to litigate.

      If you want contemporary examples of how “codified sexual relativism” interacts with entities that profess traditional Christian morals you can just Google “christian bakery gay wedding”. That’s the sort of thing you can expect for Californian Christian liberal arts schools once this bill passes.

    • Cat 1 year ago1 year ago

      It seems that the bill would require ALL anti-discriminatory categories to be followed, including religion, which would mean that any previously required religious component to the school would be unrequired. Schools like Biola or JPII would no longer be able to require religious or theology studies as part of their core curriculum. They would have to be optional which would mean most students wouldn't take it as who wants an extra non-required class? It also … Read More

      It seems that the bill would require ALL anti-discriminatory categories to be followed, including religion, which would mean that any previously required religious component to the school would be unrequired. Schools like Biola or JPII would no longer be able to require religious or theology studies as part of their core curriculum. They would have to be optional which would mean most students wouldn’t take it as who wants an extra non-required class? It also means that if any student at one of these schools feels reports that they feel discriminated against, on any basis, including religopn, their federal funding could be taken away at no notice.

  21. Les 1 year ago1 year ago

    If they strongly feel they are gay or transgender, then they are giving in to urges and the colleges mentioned above must live by God's law first and man's second as referenced in the book of Acts. God created male and female and marriage between one man and one women. All other distortions are just feel good urges. If these individuals truly believed in Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior … Read More

    If they strongly feel they are gay or transgender, then they are giving in to urges and the colleges mentioned above must live by God’s law first and man’s second as referenced in the book of Acts. God created male and female and marriage between one man and one women. All other distortions are just feel good urges. If these individuals truly believed in Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior they would not be gay or transgender, they may have the urges that they give into just like any sin, but through the power of the Holy Spirit those urges can be conquered. I will pray for those individuals and it really does not matter what California does because people have tried to squash Christianity for years and it just causes it to grow even more.

    Replies

    • Mike Simpson 1 year ago1 year ago

      Les —
      You stated “God created…marriage between one man and one women.”
      You obviously have not read your Bible.
      Concubines, rape, incest, polygamy are all in there, waiting for you to read about it.

  22. Steve McGill 1 year ago1 year ago

    It's really quite amazing that this is happening and is being discussed. Why is it so important to some that they demand to have their way with something like this? Come on, people! Call it cliche if you like, but what is this leading to? What's next? And yes, if I were the father of a small child and I saw someone of the opposite sex walk into the same restroom that my child was … Read More

    It’s really quite amazing that this is happening and is being discussed. Why is it so important to some that they demand to have their way with something like this? Come on, people! Call it cliche if you like, but what is this leading to? What’s next? And yes, if I were the father of a small child and I saw someone of the opposite sex walk into the same restroom that my child was in, I’d not only have a problem with it, but I would confront the person. That is MY right. Simply because you FEEL like you are a woman and not a man (or vice-versa), you actually think that gives YOU the right to use the women’s bathroom?! This can only lead to chaos and violence. And now our president is in on it. It’s one of his last demented hurrahs as he nears the end of his second destructive term.

    Are we REALLY talking about this? Someone please…wake me up!