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After several months of negotiations, Gov. Jerry Brown and advocates for less punitive disciplinary policies have compromised on a bill that would limit schools’ ability to suspend or expel students for “willful defiance,” according to Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento, who is sponsoring the bill.

Under the new agreement, no student can be expelled for being willfully defiant or disruptive of school activities. That subjective category has come under fire because it has been disproportionately used statewide to discipline African-American students and, in some districts, Latino students. In addition, under the amended bill, administrators would no longer be able to suspend K-3 students and send them home for being willfully defiant.

The law will sunset on Dec. 31, 2018, when legislators will have a chance to revisit the issue.

“Advocates for change would very much like to go further,” Dickinson said, “but we realize the governor’s willingness to agree to take steps at all is a significant move.”

A bill that put more limits on the use of willful defiance passed the Assembly and Senate last year. But that bill was vetoed by the governor, who said he thought disciplinary decisions should be made by local administrators. Jim Evans, a spokesman for the governor, said Brown declined to comment because the legislation is pending.

Although willful defiance accounted for less than 6 percent of expulsions statewide in 2012-13, 43 percent of all suspensions were for willful defiance. African-American students make up 6 percent of statewide enrollment, yet they comprised 19 percent of all willful defiant suspensions.

“It’s hard work, but it seems to be effective when you communicate to students that they are valued, that you want them in school, and that you want them to succeed,” said Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento.

However, the suspension figures represent a drop from 2011-12, when 48 percent of suspensions were for willful defiance. In addition, some districts, such as Los Angeles Unified and San Francisco Unified, have eliminated the category altogether.

Both within the state and nationally, the trend toward more positive disciplinary practices is very clear, Dickinson said. “As momentum continues to build, willful defiance will be eliminated over time,” he said.

Laura Faer of Public Counsel, a public interest law firm based in Los Angeles, said her group sees this agreement as a first step forward. She said she appreciates that “the governor is willing to walk with us on this” and sees the sunset clause as an invitation for more dialogue that will eventually lead to the elimination of willful defiance as a reason to suspend or expel.

“Students, parents, teachers and community members around the state are working passionately for this change,” Faer said. “Nobody’s giving up, nobody’s going away.”

Assembly Bill 420 is currently being rewritten to reflect the amendments and will be presented to the Senate when members return in August.

Both the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) and the California School Boards Association (CSBA), which had opposed more restrictive versions of the bill, say they will support AB 420 with the current amendments, according to Laura Preston, a legislative advocate for ACSA. Before eliminating the category, Preston has said, administrators and teachers need more time to implement more positive disciplinary measures, such as restorative justice, which requires students to make amends to those who were harmed by their actions. For example, if a student disrupts a class, that student might apologize to his classmates and stay after school to help the teacher prepare for the next day. ACSA had also pushed to allow administrators the option of sending suspended students home when they are in 4th grade or above.  

“No matter what someone’s overarching view is of using willful defiance to suspend or expel, everyone agrees we should be keeping 8- and 9-year-olds in school,” Dickinson said. “What lies behind the issue is making sure there is the kind of support structure in the school that gives teachers and administrators an alternative. Where schools and districts have invested in positive discipline and restorative justice, they are finding that they work and that it’s not a great big expensive undertaking.”

“That’s not to say this is easy,” he said. “It’s hard work, but it seems to be effective when you communicate to students that they are valued, that you want them in school, and that you want them to succeed.”

 

 


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  1. Berta Henry 2 years ago2 years ago

    In order to provide support for teachers and help students that are willfully defiant, the governor needs to put more money into hiring full time counselors at the elementary levels and assistant principals .

  2. CarolineSF 2 years ago2 years ago

    All legislators who vote on this and all journalists who write about it need to spend at least a day in a high-poverty classroom (where students are far more likely to suffer from PTSD and other conditions related to poverty and stress) first. No day in classroom, no vote and no write.

    Replies

    • Floyd Thursby 1941 2 years ago2 years ago

      I know you hate my views and will dismiss it but I was in classrooms in Middle School where most of the kids were from public housing and the Bay View, and on sports teams where I was the only one not from the Mission back when it wasn't considered a cool neighborhood for dot commers but was looked down upon by most whites who white flighted away in the '60s and '70s. I saw some … Read More

      I know you hate my views and will dismiss it but I was in classrooms in Middle School where most of the kids were from public housing and the Bay View, and on sports teams where I was the only one not from the Mission back when it wasn’t considered a cool neighborhood for dot commers but was looked down upon by most whites who white flighted away in the ’60s and ’70s.

      I saw some kids in poverty do poorly and some do well. However, it wasn’t the poverty itself that caused poor performance, it was parents on drugs, teachers assuming they couldn’t learn, low expectations, and parents just watching TV. It was fathers disappearing and a change in the norm that looked down on men for abandoning their children, pushed by the far left as empowering but proven by stats to hurt poor kids far more than rich ones, exacerbating inequality.

      I also saw many Asian kids in poverty do very well in school. In fact, 41% of the kids at Lowell are free or reduced lunch eligible, and Lowell beats public schools in wealthy areas like Marin, Orinda, Burlingame, Belmont, Palo Alto, Atherton, Los Gatos, on average SAT Score, areas with under 5% on free or reduced lunch. Lowell also beats 40k private schools like Marin Day and Urban and SI on average SAT Score and other test measurements, AP, college admission, etc.

      It isn’t poverty. It’s the attitudes that go along with it, the habits. Watching TV, not doing homework, being argumentative, not focusing (and the schools pay for breakfast and lunch so don’t tell me they’re starving, some of these kids are obese getting Ds next to sinny 80-100 lb. Asian kids getting As and we’re supposed to cry a river because they don’t have enough food). It’s hours studied per week, it’s getting tutoring. Many families who couldn’t possibly afford a book or a tutor or lettuce have a nice car and a nice TV and nice clothes and shoes and even drink and smoke and do drugs, which are quite expensive.

      It’s not poverty itself. It’s the habits and world outlook that go along with it in most, but not all cases. Asian immigrants and other immigrants prove it is possible to thrive in school while in poverty if it is your #1 priority.

      • Floyd Thursby 1941 2 years ago2 years ago

        And trust me Caroline, Don has spent a lot of days in high poverty classrooms as a student, teacher and parent. If you are a good kid in poverty who wants to study long hours and pay attention and get out of poverty, Don sees that those goals will likely be given up upon eventually due to constant harassment of bad kids in poverty who wish to bring down those who are striving. … Read More

        And trust me Caroline, Don has spent a lot of days in high poverty classrooms as a student, teacher and parent. If you are a good kid in poverty who wants to study long hours and pay attention and get out of poverty, Don sees that those goals will likely be given up upon eventually due to constant harassment of bad kids in poverty who wish to bring down those who are striving. We constantly hear that kids going to school with kids of a different outlook and background will benefit them by osmosis, but often you have schools most whites would look down upon like Visitacion Valley, and Asians are thriving there, and the others don’t look at them as role models or examples of something to emulate, they look at them as contemptible nerds to tease, ignore, harass, humiliate, etc. The lesson is right there, but it is ignored. Kids in poverty with 3.9 and 4.0 GPAs are not held up as models. If they were, we wouldn’t have this problem.

  3. Andrew 2 years ago2 years ago

    I'm going to be blunt about this. California teachers and unions have been far too long in the thrall of politicians, especially Democratic politicians, who are willing to pass and maintain laws that cost nothing. Laws like tenure and LIFO. And limits on suspensions. But are unwilling to fully and properly fund education. The politicians are unwilling to fund California education even at the level of the national average for educational … Read More

    I’m going to be blunt about this.

    California teachers and unions have been far too long in the thrall of politicians, especially Democratic politicians, who are willing to pass and maintain laws that cost nothing. Laws like tenure and LIFO. And limits on suspensions. But are unwilling to fully and properly fund education.

    The politicians are unwilling to fund California education even at the level of the national average for educational funding, and even though California is in the top six states for state and local tax revenues per capita. The low education funding levels are, simply put, abusive to overworked teachers and to students.

    It is hard work, Assemblyman Dickenson, but we expect you to fund education adequately. Start by at least funding it at the national average.

    Replies

    • Don 2 years ago2 years ago

      Thank you, Andrew. You don't solve any problems in California education by creating another unfunded mandate and restricting a teacher's ability to maintain class control. This is a distraction from the real problems in education. Referring to the article, the very idea that disruptive students would be asked to apologize to classmates and/or stay after school to help the teacher prepare is something that only politicians would consider a solution. Many of the students who … Read More

      Thank you, Andrew. You don’t solve any problems in California education by creating another unfunded mandate and restricting a teacher’s ability to maintain class control. This is a distraction from the real problems in education.

      Referring to the article, the very idea that disruptive students would be asked to apologize to classmates and/or stay after school to help the teacher prepare is something that only politicians would consider a solution. Many of the students who are recidivist disrupters couldn’t care less about trying to make amends, staying after school or helping out the teacher. These solutions are for Hollywood movies. Get real, people. Have you ever worked in a inner city environment? Teachers in general do not support having their behavioral tools restricted when they are daily under fire by difficult behavior. Don’t they have a legal obligation to protect their students? At the very least pass laws that provide proven corrective action over time and fund them appropriately, and then and only then institute a ban if such actions are viable.

      I can tell you that in many of the schools in which I worked and where one of my children currently attends, students lose substantial class time due to the disruptions of the few. But, hey, I guess the few troublemakers are more important than the rest of the diligent and hardworking majority. This solution just enables even worse behavior.

      • Jenni 2 years ago2 years ago

        Well said, I agree completely. I teach 8th graders, and I have 40 students per class. The teachers that I know do not support this bill at all. This strips our "tool box" per say of being able to maximize instructional time for the students. Managing classroom behavior with 40 13/14 year olds is a true skill. This bill protects the very few poorly behaved students that are impeding the learning for the rest of … Read More

        Well said, I agree completely. I teach 8th graders, and I have 40 students per class. The teachers that I know do not support this bill at all. This strips our “tool box” per say of being able to maximize instructional time for the students. Managing classroom behavior with 40 13/14 year olds is a true skill. This bill protects the very few poorly behaved students that are impeding the learning for the rest of the class. These few students have no interest in saying sorry to the entire class…this is a joke, right? We are talking about the most defiant students. These are the students that say “F#$K Y#U B*%@H!” to a teacher, in class. We can’t suspend these students now? This sends the message to the rest of the student body that you can now be as defiant as you’d like, nothing will happen to you because we now allow despicable behavior in an educational environment. Oh..wait…students might have to say “I’m sorry” (how, by force?), or help a teacher after school (yeah right). I agree that the politicians need to spend a week in some classrooms AND look at the data. You need both, not just the data. WHY are these students behaving this way? Let us look into that. Why not fund more counselors and administrators that are trained to HELP the students and their parents to LEARN the expected and correct behavior? Fund these, but don’t take away our ability to remove the students that are taking away from other’s right to learn. Suspensions are there for a reason. I agree that training the students should continue AFTER the suspension. We all have choices, and for those choices there are consequences, some good, some bad, depending on our actions. What a disservice we are providing our youth by telling them really poor behavior will not have a consequence. I’m sure if you took a police officer’s ability to arrest someone away, that hit and killed a pedestrian, they’d have a problem too. Saying “I’m sorry” is a start, but we need to train them for the real world.

  4. Andrew 2 years ago2 years ago

    “It’s hard work, but it seems to be effective when you communicate to students that they are valued, that you want them in school, and that you want them to succeed,” said Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento. Let's rewrite this, Assemblyman Dickenson . . . "It's expensive, but it seems to be effective when you provide funding for the behavioralists, the psychologists, the administrators, and the additional credentialed teaching staff to ensure that disruptive student behaviors can be … Read More

    “It’s hard work, but it seems to be effective when you communicate to students that they are valued, that you want them in school, and that you want them to succeed,” said Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento.

    Let’s rewrite this, Assemblyman Dickenson . . .

    “It’s expensive, but it seems to be effective when you provide funding for the behavioralists, the psychologists, the administrators, and the additional credentialed teaching staff to ensure that disruptive student behaviors can be addressed in school without the need for suspensions and without depriving other students of the opportunity to learn.”

  5. Angie 2 years ago2 years ago

    It is absolutely wonderful to see this bill is making progress and also helping to bring forward needed awareness and positive changes in schools. It’s time to expand PBIS and restorative/transformative justice programs across districts and uplift students and teachers, especially for our high needs students which also include students with disabilities. Thank you to Assemblymember Dickinson and all those who are putting forth these efforts!

    Replies

    • don 2 years ago2 years ago

      It is not wonderful for students who are studious and respectful and want to make the most out of their daily educational experience but can't because their classes are being disrupted throughout the day. Just saying you can't suspend students doesn't solve problems. It exacerbates them without solutions. This agreement provides no solutions but appeals to the left that will support just about any policy that pretends to address the issues of underachievement and kowtows … Read More

      It is not wonderful for students who are studious and respectful and want to make the most out of their daily educational experience but can’t because their classes are being disrupted throughout the day. Just saying you can’t suspend students doesn’t solve problems. It exacerbates them without solutions. This agreement provides no solutions but appeals to the left that will support just about any policy that pretends to address the issues of underachievement and kowtows to any and all minority-minded endeavors, silly as some are. Classroom professionals know better than the gullible and unsuspecting public.

      • Floyd Thursby 1941 2 years ago2 years ago

        Angie, you mention students with disabilities as if it is a sad situation where they are victims, but what about kids with no disabilities who choose to disrupt classrooms? Kids who swear, fail to properly conjugate verbs even when corrected and know better, yell, fight, throw things, etc? What do you feel will close the achievement gap? Do you feel behavior or effort have any role? Do you think teachers should … Read More

        Angie, you mention students with disabilities as if it is a sad situation where they are victims, but what about kids with no disabilities who choose to disrupt classrooms? Kids who swear, fail to properly conjugate verbs even when corrected and know better, yell, fight, throw things, etc? What do you feel will close the achievement gap? Do you feel behavior or effort have any role? Do you think teachers should ever be able to suspend anyone? I can tell you as a studious child in a diverse school, it was not wonderful when other kids behaved badly. Kids follow peers as much as teachers, so if all the kids can say we was over and over and not be corrected, more kids start saying that, which is cute until they can’t find a job. Not to mention the out and out violence. How you feel this is wonderful is beyond me. It takes power away from teachers and administrators.

  6. Bob 2 years ago2 years ago

    This news is disgusting.

    Replies

    • Floyd Thursby 1941 2 years ago2 years ago

      What if one child is disrupting the learning of 20? At some point you have to consider the greater good, no?

      • Bob 2 years ago2 years ago

        You’re right. I meant this bill is disgusting.

        We need to put a stop to it.

      • Jenni 2 years ago2 years ago

        Yes, this bill protects the 1, leaves the 20…wait no…40 in my classes, in the dust.

  7. Diane Olsen 2 years ago2 years ago

    This is a start to keeping all children in their schools. The question I still have is about students who are not necessarily suspended or expelled, but are placed in alternative placements, or Community Day Schools (CDS) through what districts and schools call "administrative placement". This is a loophole that does need to be addressed. Schools that find they don't have the time to undertake the "hardwork" of positive discipline or restorative … Read More

    This is a start to keeping all children in their schools. The question I still have is about students who are not necessarily suspended or expelled, but are placed in alternative placements, or Community Day Schools (CDS) through what districts and schools call “administrative placement”. This is a loophole that does need to be addressed. Schools that find they don’t have the time to undertake the “hardwork” of positive discipline or restorative justice use the ‘administrative placement’ as a way of avoiding suspensions or expulsions by sending the student away to an alternative setting or CDS. Administrators completing a packet that describes how the student is disrupting the learning environment with their defiance or behaviors and then get superintendent approval to send the student to an alternative placement thereby bypassing the administrative hearing panel for expulsion.

  8. Don 2 years ago2 years ago

    This agreement on willful defiance at the state level puts the lie to true motivation underlying LCFF which really is a mechanism to get rid of state supervision of state laws. If Governor Brown wants more local control why is he mandating local suspension decisions at the state level? The whole premise of the argument for the ban is that certain minorities are suspended at a higher rate and the numbers imply that racism is … Read More

    This agreement on willful defiance at the state level puts the lie to true motivation underlying LCFF which really is a mechanism to get rid of state supervision of state laws. If Governor Brown wants more local control why is he mandating local suspension decisions at the state level? The whole premise of the argument for the ban is that certain minorities are suspended at a higher rate and the numbers imply that racism is at the heart of such disproportionate suspensions. If that is true why doesn’t the same racism apply to incarceration rates? Some kids grow up through no fault of their own in much more hostile environments and those hostilities are acted out at school. This is a cultural issue not a racism issue. Unless we want to create mass disruption to the classroom, funding for the ban is required to provide an alternative and appropriately staffed learning environment for students who cannot be sent home but can’t function in the regular classroom. Andrew pointed out that fallacy. Keeping kids in school keeps them off the street but it doesn’t provide assistance. That is what’s missing. We have another unfunded state mandate under the auspices of local control. And the local mechanisms for implementation are not materializing. Several years into Restorative Practices, SFUSD has yet to adequately train and staff schools in its application. This ban is very disrespectful to teachers in particular.Previously Brown has said these suspension decisions should be made at the local level. Then he changed his mind.

    SFUSD Superintendent Richard Carranza can be seen on You Tube giving a speech in which he says that it would be disrespectful to administrators if he were to ban willful suspensions. Shortly afterwards he supported the Board’s resolution to ban them. That was a political decision. We need to get the politics out of the classroom and let teachers and administrators do their jobs. I support clear guidelines for suspensions, but bans are over that line.

    Replies

    • Don 2 years ago2 years ago

      I'd also like to point out the hypocrisy of those who would support the ban but not the easier dismissal of teachers (Vergara). It's teachers who suspend students from the classroom, which is their prerogative by CA law. Therefore, teachers are at the heart of the disproportionate numbers according to the thinking of those who use statistics to rationalize a ban. But if teachers are responsible, whether through racism or ineffectiveness at classroom control, we … Read More

      I’d also like to point out the hypocrisy of those who would support the ban but not the easier dismissal of teachers (Vergara). It’s teachers who suspend students from the classroom, which is their prerogative by CA law. Therefore, teachers are at the heart of the disproportionate numbers according to the thinking of those who use statistics to rationalize a ban. But if teachers are responsible, whether through racism or ineffectiveness at classroom control, we should be making it easier for administrators dismiss them. A ban does not solve the problem. It exacerbates it by enabling unproductive behavior on the part of both the troubled student and the teacher.

      While Carranza and Brown reversed on the issue, their first instincts that a ban was disrespectful to staff was inadequate also. Though they may have had a point, the real disrespect implicit in this ban is to those students who simply want to go to school and learn as is their constitutional right. Few people seem to care about the rights of the majority of students. For this reason, the middle class will continue their exodus from traditional public schools. Ironically, this sort of ban just fuels the market for charters.

      • navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

        If it’s hypocrisy then it proves that teachers are not the problem as acting racist or even discrimintory is already grounds for dismissal.

        • navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

          Excuse me, proves that the law is not the problem.

          • Don 2 years ago2 years ago

            But as far as I'm concerned, removing willfully defiance students from the classroom is the right thing to do, regardless of the color of their skin as long as the action is not racists in its intent. And while administrators authorize the suspension, its the teachers who initiate the process of removal. If you've ever worked in an environment with hostile, incorrigible, and willfully defiant students you will know that teaching is impossible under … Read More

            But as far as I’m concerned, removing willfully defiance students from the classroom is the right thing to do, regardless of the color of their skin as long as the action is not racists in its intent. And while administrators authorize the suspension, its the teachers who initiate the process of removal. If you’ve ever worked in an environment with hostile, incorrigible, and willfully defiant students you will know that teaching is impossible under that circumstance. These are rules and laws written up by people who don’t actually have to deal with these problems on a daily basis. They are political decisions not based on what is instructionally sound.

      • el 2 years ago2 years ago

        It is administrators who suspend students, not teachers. Administrators are relatively easy to fire in terms of the law and the process to do so.

        • Don 2 years ago2 years ago

          (a) A teacher may suspend any pupil from class, for any of the acts enumerated in Section 48900, for the day of the suspension and the day following. The teacher shall immediately report the suspension to the principal of the school and send the pupil to the principal or the designee of the principal for appropriate action. If that action requires the continued presence of the pupil at the schoolsite, the pupil shall be under … Read More

          (a) A teacher may suspend any pupil from class, for any of the acts enumerated in Section 48900, for the day of the suspension and the day following. The teacher shall immediately report the suspension to the principal of the school and send the pupil to the principal or the designee of the principal for appropriate action. If that action requires the continued presence of the pupil at the schoolsite, the pupil shall be under appropriate supervision, as defined in policies and related regulations adopted by the governing board of the school district. As soon as possible, the teacher shall ask the parent or guardian of the pupil to attend a parent-teacher conference regarding the suspension. If practicable, a school counselor or a school psychologist may attend the conference. A school administrator shall attend the conference if the teacher or the parent or guardian so requests. The pupil shall not be returned to the class from which he or she was suspended, during the period of the suspension, without the concurrence of the teacher of the class and the principal.

          (b) A pupil suspended from a class shall not be placed in another regular class during the period of suspension. However, if the pupil is assigned to more than one class per day this subdivision shall apply only to other regular classes scheduled at the same time as the class from which the pupil was suspended.

          (c) A teacher may also refer a pupil, for any of the acts enumerated in Section 48900, to the principal or the designee of the principal for consideration of a suspension from the school.

          (Amended by Stats. 2004, Ch. 895, Sec. 10.)

          Reference:

          Education Code 48900

          • Jenni 2 years ago2 years ago

            “From class”….again, teachers cannot suspend from SCHOOL…ONLY from their particular class. ONLY admin can suspend from school.

      • Jenni 2 years ago2 years ago

        Teachers cannot suspend students from school in the secondary setting. Teachers have a right to suspend a student from their class for up to 2 days if they felt threatened, harassed, etc...possibly a student said "F&*K O$F B%$#H", and that teacher deems it necessary for that student to be removed from the learning environment. This student still remains at school, and for that class period, is in the admin's office doing work. They are not … Read More

        Teachers cannot suspend students from school in the secondary setting. Teachers have a right to suspend a student from their class for up to 2 days if they felt threatened, harassed, etc…possibly a student said “F&*K O$F B%$#H”, and that teacher deems it necessary for that student to be removed from the learning environment. This student still remains at school, and for that class period, is in the admin’s office doing work. They are not sent home as “suspended.”

        Teachers DO NOT suspend students from school, only administration has the right to do that.

  9. Paul Muench 2 years ago2 years ago

    Are there limits/safeguards in this bill or existing law that prevent the use of serial suspensions to create an effective expulsion?

    Replies

    • Susan Frey 2 years ago2 years ago

      Hi Paul, Existing law covers that. Here is the relevant Education Code section: 48903 (a) Except as provided in subdivision (g) of Section 48911 and in Section 48912, the total number of days for which a pupil may be suspended from school shall not exceed 20 schooldays in any school year, unless for purposes of adjustment, a pupil enrolls in or is transferred to another regular school, an opportunity school or class, or a continuation education school or class, in which case … Read More

      Hi Paul,

      Existing law covers that. Here is the relevant Education Code section:

      48903 (a) Except as provided in subdivision (g) of Section 48911
      and in Section 48912, the total number of days for which a pupil may
      be suspended from school shall not exceed 20 schooldays in any school
      year, unless for purposes of adjustment, a pupil enrolls in or is
      transferred to another regular school, an opportunity school or
      class, or a continuation education school or class, in which case the
      total number of schooldays for which the pupil may be suspended
      shall not exceed 30 days in any school year.
      (b) For the purposes of this section, a school district may count
      suspensions that occur while a pupil is enrolled in another school
      district toward the maximum number of days for which a pupil may be
      suspended in any school year.

      Sue

  10. Andrew 2 years ago2 years ago

    “It’s hard work, but it seems to be effective when you communicate to students that they are valued, that you want them in school, and that you want them to succeed,” said Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento. California High Schools are already running at half the credentialed teaching staff per student population relative to the national average. So California high school teachers just need to work even harder, in addition to carrying double loads of … Read More

    “It’s hard work, but it seems to be effective when you communicate to students that they are valued, that you want them in school, and that you want them to succeed,” said Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento.

    California High Schools are already running at half the credentialed teaching staff per student population relative to the national average. So California high school teachers just need to work even harder, in addition to carrying double loads of students? Harder work in making sure that each of the, say, 180 students in a teacher’s classes is suitably socially reformed. Will these teachers’ efforts somehow fix a student with clinical antisocial personality disorder that even intensive state-of-the art psychiatric treatment can’t touch? Will administrative staff supply the extra effort when California is already lowest in the nation in the ratio of administrators to students?

    It sounds like issue is headed to becoming yet another unfunded mandate. A lot more work and need for facilities and personnel and yet those who impose it are not willing to pay for viable alternatives. It seems like the answer to every problem is that overworked teachers are expected to work harder and harder and be stretched thinner.

    Replies

    • navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

      Yes, that's exactly the answer; at least for anti union and privatization strategists. Budgets and other policy are creating situations making it more difficult for teachers to succeed. To make matters worse, the increased burden on teachers and years of frozen or even reduced pay is contributing to an environment where increasing salaries 'makes sense'. However, that strategy will explicitly prohibit reversing any staffing level trends, maintaining or even increasing the teacher burden, and thus … Read More

      Yes, that’s exactly the answer; at least for anti union and privatization strategists. Budgets and other policy are creating situations making it more difficult for teachers to succeed. To make matters worse, the increased burden on teachers and years of frozen or even reduced pay is contributing to an environment where increasing salaries ‘makes sense’. However, that strategy will explicitly prohibit reversing any staffing level trends, maintaining or even increasing the teacher burden, and thus the likelihood of educational failure. Education is already in a chokehold. Current momentum is like saying, see, you can’t breathe anyway, there is no reason to let up.

  11. navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

    Expulsion for willful defiance doesn’t make sense anyway. And although 43% of suspensions were for that reason, we really need to understand how many of those were for k-3 students to understand the impact this (amended) bill will have.

    Replies

    • Don 2 years ago2 years ago

      Please explain why it doesn’t make sense.

      • navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

        Expulsion is a formal rejection of a student’s right to a public education. It is reserved for the most egregious of offenses. Willful defiance, by definition, is the left-over, catch-all for things that are not egregious enough to specify in ed code. Applying the most severe punishment for literally undefined offenses that just seem to be bad enough makes no sense.

        • Gary Ravani 2 years ago2 years ago

          Not quite. A student retains the right to a free public education even if he/she is expelled from a district. An alternative setting must be found, often at a “community school,” but also in another district.

          • navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

            True. I meant in that particular environment (and I guess even perhaps for some duration) though I think in some states if the child is over a certain age an alternative doesn’t need to be found. Anyway the point was that it is the local districts option of last resort and should be reserved for behaviors of las resort.

          • el 2 years ago2 years ago

            I think we can agree that the opportunities and the education available at a community day school are a significant subset of what is available at a regular high school. It doesn't make them bad schools, and sometimes kids really benefit from the different structure there, but I think navigio's point that an expulsion significantly impacts a student's right to a free public education stands. It's true even if the student is accepted at another … Read More

            I think we can agree that the opportunities and the education available at a community day school are a significant subset of what is available at a regular high school. It doesn’t make them bad schools, and sometimes kids really benefit from the different structure there, but I think navigio’s point that an expulsion significantly impacts a student’s right to a free public education stands. It’s true even if the student is accepted at another regular school but must commute.

            Obviously, some students have elected via their behavior to forfeit a part of that right, but it’s important that it was the only possible solution, and not merely an administrator’s lack of training or toolkit or ability to cope.

          • Jenni 2 years ago2 years ago

            Yes, and in addition to what you’ve said, they may return to the school site they were expelled from in a only a year’s time! I’ve had several students return from an expulsion.

          • Jenni 2 years ago2 years ago

            Yes Gary, you are right, other districts take expelled students. They have to go somewhere. Often, before a student gets expelled from one district (20 suspensions), parent moves said child to neighboring district to start the process over. This happened with one of my students last year. He had 19 suspensions in previous district, and was up for expulsion. He moved to my district, and within 6 months had accrued 17 suspensions. Most of his … Read More

            Yes Gary, you are right, other districts take expelled students. They have to go somewhere. Often, before a student gets expelled from one district (20 suspensions), parent moves said child to neighboring district to start the process over. This happened with one of my students last year. He had 19 suspensions in previous district, and was up for expulsion. He moved to my district, and within 6 months had accrued 17 suspensions. Most of his suspensions were for fighting, bullying, and cursing out teachers/staff. I used every “tool” I had to help him be successful. He went onto the high school, not sure how he’s doing. Every year the suspension are wiped clean and student gets to start with a “fresh” record.

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