CREDIT: iStock_Ryan-Balderas

California teachers may soon have more flexibility when it comes to the tests they are required to take to earn a credential.

The state’s Assembly and Senate budget subcommittees on education are recommending that legislators approve a proposal in Gov. Gavin Newsom’s 2021-22 state budget that would allow candidates to earn a teaching credential without taking two tests currently required.

If it is approved, candidates wouldn’t have to take the California Basic Educational Skills Test, or CBEST, or the California Subject Examinations for Teachers, or CSET, if they have earned a grade of B or better in qualifying coursework or tests that apply toward requirements for a degree.

Currently, a teacher candidate is required to prove proficiency in basic reading, writing and math by passing the CBEST or other approved exams. The test is usually taken before a student is accepted into a teacher preparation program.

The education trailer bill released May 14 outlines the types of courses that students in teacher preparation programs can take instead of the CBEST. Classes in critical thinking, literature, philosophy, reading, rhetoric or textual analysis can be taken to prove the teacher has basic reading skills.

Classes in composition, English and rhetoric can prove basic writing skills, and courses in algebra, geometry, mathematics, quantitative reasoning or statistics can be taken to prove basic math skills.

Teacher candidates also have been required to pass tests that are part of the California Subject Examinations for Teachers to earn a credential. Elementary school teachers must pass three tests — in science and math; reading, language, literature, history and social science; and physical education, human development and visual and performing arts — to earn a multiple-subject credential. Middle and high school teachers earn single-subject credentials in areas such as art, biology or English by passing at least one subject exam.

If the proposal is approved, teacher candidates will have the option of taking coursework at a university in the content area of the credential they are pursuing to prove subject-matter competence instead of taking some or all of the CSET tests required for their credential.

“It’s promising to see the governor and Legislature come together in support of new options for aspiring teachers to demonstrate knowledge and skills through coursework,” said Mary Vixie Sandy, executive director of the Commission on Teacher Credentialing. “These new flexibilities will strike the right balance by upholding rigorous standards and reducing unnecessary barriers to the teaching profession.”

The proposal, which has gone unchallenged by legislators during the budget process, still needs to be approved by the full Legislature as part of the budget package by June 15. Legislators must negotiate a final state budget with the governor and pass it by June 30.

California’s teacher candidates have been required to take up to six tests to earn a credential, depending on what they plan to teach. The tests have been a major stumbling block for many, with nearly half of California’s potential teachers struggling to pass the standardized tests required to earn a credential, according to data from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

In the past two years, the commission has convened workgroups and held numerous meetings to study how to best reform the testing process. The Covid-19 pandemic ramped up these efforts as testing centers closed, making it difficult to take the required tests.

In spring 2020 Newsom and the Commission on Teacher Credentialing began easing some rules for the required tests. Last June the governor gave teachers more time to complete all the requirements for a credential and more time to submit information missing from applications. The new budget proposes suspending test requirements another year if a credential candidate is unable to complete an assessment because of testing center closures or capacity limits.

The proposed changes to teacher testing are largely the same as those proposed last year in Assembly Bill 1982, which addressed the CBEST, and Assembly Bill 2485, which addressed the CSET. Both failed to pass before the end of the legislative session last year. The biggest difference between the budget proposal and last year’s bills is that the bills, meant to help teachers complete their credentials during the coronavirus pandemic, were set to end after three years. The new proposal has no sunset date.

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  1. MRaum 5 months ago5 months ago

    How do we find out if we need collegiate-level classes instead of CSET/CBEST? Will CTC or the university notify?
    What about RICA?

    Replies

    • Jennifer 4 months ago4 months ago

      Did you hear anything about the RICA?

  2. Mayra Guerra 5 months ago5 months ago

    I am so relieved about these exams being eliminated and replaced with other options yay!!!

  3. Joe 5 months ago5 months ago

    July 13th CTC press release for the CBEST and CSET.

  4. Jennifer 5 months ago5 months ago

    Trailer bill No. AB 130 states the following: 23) Amends the demonstrations of competence for teacher basic skills and subject matter knowledge. Specifically, language expands the list of allowable exemptions from the basic skills proficiency test to include applicants that earn at least a “B” grade in qualifying coursework to demonstrate subject matter proficiency or are designated proficient by a credential program, would specify that the minimum requirements for a preliminary single or multiple subject teaching … Read More

    Trailer bill No. AB 130 states the following:
    23) Amends the demonstrations of competence for teacher basic skills and subject matter knowledge. Specifically, language expands the list of allowable exemptions from the basic skills proficiency test to include applicants that earn at least a “B” grade in qualifying coursework to demonstrate subject matter proficiency or are designated proficient by a credential program, would specify that the minimum requirements for a preliminary single or multiple subject teaching credential include verification of subject matter competence, through specified means, and provides alternative assessment authority to the CTC.
    Source:
    https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billAnalysisClient.xhtml

  5. Joe 5 months ago5 months ago

    Assembly Bill 130 includes the CBEST AND CSET ‘trailer bills’ which will be signed soon. So excited! Hope this info helps.

  6. Jessica 5 months ago5 months ago

    So far when I was reading the SB 112 Budget Act of 2021 it only discusses "waive fee" for first time Teacher Credentials for the year 21-22. I didn't see anything about the CBSET or CSET being "gone" or "using alternative course work." Just waiving the fee. So I am not sure where the author of this report got the information, if you could please provide information. Thanks. Read More

    So far when I was reading the SB 112 Budget Act of 2021 it only discusses “waive fee” for first time Teacher Credentials for the year 21-22. I didn’t see anything about the CBSET or CSET being “gone” or “using alternative course work.” Just waiving the fee. So I am not sure where the author of this report got the information, if you could please provide information. Thanks.

  7. MRaum 5 months ago5 months ago

    When and where can I get more details on the status of CBEST and CSET changes?

  8. Mayra Guerra 5 months ago5 months ago

    I’m confused. Once they settled the coursework that were supposed to take instead of the exams, do the teacher preparation programs notify us about this?

  9. Traci 5 months ago5 months ago

    So when will I know if I have to keep taking the CSET? I’m not sure where to look for the information. I feel like I’ve done so much research but can’t find anything on the topic. Thanks!

  10. Carla Meshack 5 months ago5 months ago

    So, I am a bit late... did the bill pass? Are we still required to take both tests? I just think it's crazy what potential teachers and teachers have to go through just to educate our children. It should not be this hard to work in education. Taking credential courses should suffice! Also, it cost so much for these tests, no wonder people chose to look into other occupations. … Read More

    So, I am a bit late… did the bill pass? Are we still required to take both tests? I just think it’s crazy what potential teachers and teachers have to go through just to educate our children. It should not be this hard to work in education. Taking credential courses should suffice! Also, it cost so much for these tests, no wonder people chose to look into other occupations. Last year was my first year teaching and I truly love it so much. I hope we can move on from both the CSET and CBEST!

    Replies

    • Jennifer 5 months ago5 months ago

      It passed but there isn't any info currently on what exactly will happen. The only thing the legislature said is that it recommended a grade of a B or higher in courses to be considered to waive a portion of the CSET like a B in stats so you don't take the math portion. The problem is will this apply to undergrads or can substitute teachers with a bachelor's go back to take a college … Read More

      It passed but there isn’t any info currently on what exactly will happen. The only thing the legislature said is that it recommended a grade of a B or higher in courses to be considered to waive a portion of the CSET like a B in stats so you don’t take the math portion.

      The problem is will this apply to undergrads or can substitute teachers with a bachelor’s go back to take a college class to waive a portion of the test? Will the classes have to be upper division level or will lower division courses at the community collage be considered? Also, will colleges allow us to substitute a course we believe would suffice like an intro to stats vs the college saying stats for elementary student teaching.

  11. Jizelled 5 months ago5 months ago

    A previous comment mentioned the tests are super expensive for candidates in California. Is there any other reason for students to struggle to pass those tests? Are the test covering things that are not part of a teacher curriculum?

    Replies

    • Jennifer 5 months ago5 months ago

      Issue is the tests are more rigorous than needed to be. For example, teaching elementary students Math shouldn’t require a teacher to know statistics, yet the tests are more complicated than they have to be. Also the writing portion doesn’t make sense and they don’t have an option to take a different test and or repeat the multiple choice or written portion instead of redoing the both due to low score.

  12. Kay 5 months ago5 months ago

    Would alternatives be looking at college transcripts to see that they have taken college prep work? For example critical thinking/ writing course will be accepted alternative for the CBSET reading section.

    Replies

    • John 5 months ago5 months ago

      Would this apply to post bachelor or only before bachelor students and will courses for lower division be considered or only upper division courses to be able to waive a part of the test?

  13. Kimberly Perez 5 months ago5 months ago

    It is my understanding from a credential analyst that students affected through the Covid-19 times will be the only ones eligible for this bill. Can anyone giver more information on that? So glad this bill passed but now hoping we are all covered on it.

  14. Linda Pico 5 months ago5 months ago

    I am a former teacher of 36 years. My question is: How many legislators would be in office if they had to pass a test to get the job. In fact let most of them take the CBEST and watch only 10% of them would pass. Then give the 10% the CSET and only 1% would pass, and they run our government.

    Also, test are not area subject specific nor geared to grade level teaching from K-5

    Replies

    • John 5 months ago5 months ago

      Exactly!!! The amount of hopes teachers have to go through is insane. 4 years bachelor's, 2 years of credentials, and all these pointless tests! Then people complain that our teachers are not interested to teach well who would be when right out the gate we aren't even respected. The tests should be waived portion by portion. For example a B in stats should exempt you from the Math portion of the CSET, or a science … Read More

      Exactly!!! The amount of hopes teachers have to go through is insane. 4 years bachelor’s, 2 years of credentials, and all these pointless tests! Then people complain that our teachers are not interested to teach well who would be when right out the gate we aren’t even respected. The tests should be waived portion by portion. For example a B in stats should exempt you from the Math portion of the CSET, or a science with a lab should exempt from the Science portion of the CSET. And like you said, they don’t teach material geared toward the grade level you are teaching. K-5 Math isn’t complicated yet the test makes it seem like you are teaching Math for advanced high school students

      • Carla Meshack 5 months ago5 months ago

        Oh my goodness, John, I do agree with you on every point made! I think the schools have missed out on many great educators simply because of all of the hoops! If we can remove all of the red tape we would see some amazing teachers!

  15. Javier 5 months ago5 months ago

    So any update if the CSET will be getting waived? I can’t find any new news about it.

    Replies

    • Diana Lambert 5 months ago5 months ago

      State legislators passed the budget bill, which included allowing teacher candidates additional alternatives to the CSET and CBEST. Trailer bill will offer more details in the next few days. Stay tuned.

      • Gurpreet Kalra 5 months ago5 months ago

        Thank you very much, Diana, for keeping us posted. I read your article posted today. Finally … a good news for us all. I am waiting for the next clear guidelines for taking the course work. A big congratulations to us all.

      • Amna Haque 5 months ago5 months ago

        Thank you so much for the update.

      • Marine 5 months ago5 months ago

        Will this apply to people who are currently substitutes and already have their degree? Can they go back to school to earn a qualifying grade in coursework to waive the test?

      • Mayra Guerra 5 months ago5 months ago

        When will these changes take effect?

      • Amy Ebert 5 months ago5 months ago

        Hi Diana! I am wondering if this bill might apply to school counselor candidates who are also currently required to pass the CBEST to obtain a PPS credential from the CTC. I always wondered why we were required to pass this (especially the math section of the CBEST) and presumed it was because teachers were required to pass it. I appreciate your thoughts and any information you might have about that. Thank you so much … Read More

        Hi Diana! I am wondering if this bill might apply to school counselor candidates who are also currently required to pass the CBEST to obtain a PPS credential from the CTC. I always wondered why we were required to pass this (especially the math section of the CBEST) and presumed it was because teachers were required to pass it. I appreciate your thoughts and any information you might have about that. Thank you so much for the great coverage you have been providing on this area!

      • Lisa 5 months ago5 months ago

        Any update? With what coursework would allow substitution

  16. Marcela 5 months ago5 months ago

    There is a massive teacher shortage especially in CA. I feel that these tests are discriminating and are keeping people who want to become teachers out of the classroom. I have taken the CBEST twice and still have not passed it. I have always had a high GPA in college and have always struggled with taking tests as I learn differently. I have gone through tutoring sessions and everything. I also think the CSETS should … Read More

    There is a massive teacher shortage especially in CA. I feel that these tests are discriminating and are keeping people who want to become teachers out of the classroom. I have taken the CBEST twice and still have not passed it. I have always had a high GPA in college and have always struggled with taking tests as I learn differently. I have gone through tutoring sessions and everything. I also think the CSETS should go especially for people who have college degrees as college tuition adds up and I feel that the government is taking loads of money from people each time they take these pointless tests. I believe that one entering a teacher preparation program should be good enough.

  17. Manny 5 months ago5 months ago

    If you guys want send a message directly to Gavin Newson to continue to fight for the removal of the CBEST and CSET https://govapps.gov.ca.gov/gov40mail/ and send this link to friends and family members

    Replies

    • Gurpreet Kalra 5 months ago5 months ago

      Thank you Manny for sharing the link. I have left a message in regards to removing CSET exams. I am going to share the link with my family and friends too. I hope we all get to do our little bit to make sure these unfair exams are removed from credential requirements.

    • Amna Haque 5 months ago5 months ago

      I did it too.

  18. Diana Lambert 5 months ago5 months ago

    Hello everyone. Legislators passed a state budget Monday that is a placeholder to meet the June 15 constitutional deadline. You can check out the story by John Fensterwald on the website. This means that negotiations on the budget, including the future of the CBEST and CSET, are continuing. The final budget will come out before July 1.

    Replies

    • Jack 5 months ago5 months ago

      Thank you for the update! So July 1 we will find out whether it has passed or not?

    • MR 5 months ago5 months ago

      Thanks for the updated information. If it passes, will it go into action this year or next?

    • Amna Haque 5 months ago5 months ago

      Any update on waiving CSET and CBEST?

  19. Jazmyne 5 months ago5 months ago

    I hope there is an update soon, currently struggling with the CSET and this would mean so much to me and so many others

  20. H Jack 5 months ago5 months ago

    So did it pass? Was the CBEST and CSET waived? Is there any update

  21. Genie Sunga 6 months ago6 months ago

    Is there any updates about the approval of just taking course work in lieu of taking CBEST and CSET?

  22. Amna Haque 6 months ago6 months ago

    I totally agree, these tests don’t measure teaching abilities. Both RICA and CSET should be waived.

  23. Replies

    • Amna Haque 5 months ago5 months ago

      Assembly bill 2485

      • Claire Smith 5 months ago5 months ago

        That one died

  24. Debra sarver 6 months ago6 months ago

    Good riddance CBEST. When I took it there was a question lacking punctuation that could have been answered by two of the choices, depending on which punctuation was used. When I approached the proctor, he told me my only ‘remediation’ was to memorize the question and the answers and challenge it afterward.

  25. Susan Charles 6 months ago6 months ago

    Yeah a move in the right direction!

    Replies

    • MR 6 months ago6 months ago

      I 100% agree with you.

  26. John 6 months ago6 months ago

    Forcing teachers to pass a test like the CSET is complete BS. There are excellent teachers who simply can't pass the tests who can teach students perfectly and there are teachers who can ace every single test and then fail to teach their students correctly. Imagine how dumb it is to waste 4 years on a bachelor's then 2 years for credentials just so you can't be a teacher because you aren't "qualified". You could … Read More

    Forcing teachers to pass a test like the CSET is complete BS. There are excellent teachers who simply can’t pass the tests who can teach students perfectly and there are teachers who can ace every single test and then fail to teach their students correctly.

    Imagine how dumb it is to waste 4 years on a bachelor’s then 2 years for credentials just so you can’t be a teacher because you aren’t “qualified”. You could have had a 4.0 in all your classes and it wouldn’t matter, so what’s the point of the degree? What’s the point of having credentials? The courses are meaningless and teachers have to be in a classroom setting to get first hand experience in teaching, courses, tests, credentials don’t mean shit.

    If you can teach you can teach, you don’t need to waste years on end to prove you can teach.

    Replies

    • Arissa 6 months ago6 months ago

      I 100% agree with you. All that is covered in the CSET was covered during undergrad and passed/completed successfully. That isn’t enough?

    • Dr. Bill Conrad 6 months ago6 months ago

      All mature professions use credentialing exams.

      Student academic outcomes in this nation are so abysmal, especially for our children of color, that we know that the teaching pool is already unprepared in content and pedagogy.

      The opportunity to teach is a not a right. It must be earned.

      Fail the tests? Look for another job.

      • Gur 6 months ago6 months ago

        But we have already taken the tests to clear our graduate and post graduate degrees , for 6 years in a masters programs. ,,, teachers are not holding degrees without taking exams … why to take the tests again, this is ridiculous .

      • Janet 5 months ago5 months ago

        Lol, so waste 4 years in the bachelors and 2 years in credentials just to not pass one test and then “look for another job,” you’re out of your mind. I’ve seen teachers ace the CSET and can’t teach and I’ve seen teachers fail the CSET and teach at a level that will leave you speechless

    • MP 6 months ago6 months ago

      Hi John, I agree 100%. If you have earned a bachelors degree - the CBEST should be waived. For the CSET, they should allow us to substitute coursework. For me personally, I am pursuing a full math credential: 3 subtests. I have passed subtest 1 and 2 which qualifies me to teach up to middle school aka foundational math. However, I did not pass subtest 3 because it's … Read More

      Hi John,

      I agree 100%. If you have earned a bachelors degree – the CBEST should be waived.

      For the CSET, they should allow us to substitute coursework. For me personally, I am pursuing a full math credential: 3 subtests. I have passed subtest 1 and 2 which qualifies me to teach up to middle school aka foundational math. However, I did not pass subtest 3 because it’s strictly calculus which I have not taken in 10 years and I am still studying for it.

      I will enter student teaching this fall.

    • CJ 6 months ago6 months ago

      The CBEST and CSETs are ridiculously easy tests. Any teacher should be able to pass them. As tedious as they are, they do offer assurance that teachers have the background necessary to teach students to a certain standard. California is dealing with a teacher shortage and it is much easier for the state to lower teaching requirements than it is to reduce the costs to become a teacher or pay teachers a higher wage. This … Read More

      The CBEST and CSETs are ridiculously easy tests. Any teacher should be able to pass them. As tedious as they are, they do offer assurance that teachers have the background necessary to teach students to a certain standard. California is dealing with a teacher shortage and it is much easier for the state to lower teaching requirements than it is to reduce the costs to become a teacher or pay teachers a higher wage. This will certainly result in more, albeit less-qualified, teachers.

      • Jim 5 months ago5 months ago

        Um no, there are teacher candidates who have had a 4.0 and can’t pass the test yet would make for excellent teachers, and there are teachers who passed the test and can not teach at all and just go day by day collecting a paycheck. If you spend 4 years on a bachelor's and 2 years for credentialing, why do you need to take additional tests? If the college courses don’t prepare you to be … Read More

        Um no, there are teacher candidates who have had a 4.0 and can’t pass the test yet would make for excellent teachers, and there are teachers who passed the test and can not teach at all and just go day by day collecting a paycheck. If you spend 4 years on a bachelor’s and 2 years for credentialing, why do you need to take additional tests? If the college courses don’t prepare you to be a teacher, then what is the test going to do? It’s just a cash grab and makes it harder for great teachers to teach.

        What happens after you pass the test? You never take it again, based on your logic they should take the test every 5 years or so to see if they are competent enough to teach.

        • CJ 5 months ago5 months ago

          A teacher doesn’t have to pass the chemistry CSET (or English CSET or US History CSET), but they are instructing their students to pass far more rigorous AP assessments? A teacher doesn’t have to pass a basic skills exam but they are instructing their students to do well on a college admission exam when the very mission of their school is to “prepare students for academic success in college”? I’m not following the logic.

          • John 5 months ago5 months ago

            If 4 years plus 2 years credentials doesn’t qualify you to be a teacher, then why waste 6 years in school when all you need to do is pass an easy test and teach the next day? Make it make sense.

    • MR 6 months ago6 months ago

      Hi John, you stated it very clearly. I have been in Early childhood education for years now. I am in a grad program and will be student teaching this Fall. I love working with children each day that ai work. Tests make me nervous- and give make me anxious no matter how well prepared I maybe.

      It will be a relief when some of these tests will be eliminated-financially as well.

  27. Fred 6 months ago6 months ago

    Teachers have already been able to substitute coursework for CSETs for years.

  28. Richard Rasiej 6 months ago6 months ago

    As a math education researcher who focuses specifically on improving the quality of instruction in K-5, I believe that the standards for math/science subtest from CSET are already absurdly low. Candidates can score reasonably well on the science portion and poorly on the math portion and still pass the subtest because the two portions are not considered individually. Research shows that most elementary school teachers have poor math content knowledge, do not … Read More

    As a math education researcher who focuses specifically on improving the quality of instruction in K-5, I believe that the standards for math/science subtest from CSET are already absurdly low. Candidates can score reasonably well on the science portion and poorly on the math portion and still pass the subtest because the two portions are not considered individually. Research shows that most elementary school teachers have poor math content knowledge, do not understand how to evaluate student thinking, and have high degrees of anxiety in teaching the subject.

    Suggesting that the credentialization test can be skipped with a B in “qualifying coursework” is further lowering the bar given the extent of grade inflation in most post-secondary institutions.

    I truly believe that the net result of these changes will be even worse outcomes for all of California’s students, especially for minority populations.

    As far as math is concerned, K-5 instruction should be provided by subject matter specialists, not the typical elementary school teacher.

  29. Richard Cranium 6 months ago6 months ago

    If you can’t pass the CBEST, you shouldn’t be anywhere near a classroom. If you can’t pass subject matter equivalency tests, you should ask yourself what you learned and studied and maybe start a class action against your university.

    The tests are easy and they demonstrate that you actually are competent. Doing away with these will only lower standards for education, and the bar isn’t set that high already.

    Replies

    • Jake Traina 6 months ago6 months ago

      Passing tests has no scientific backing to show teacher efficacy. If a teacher has received an associates, bachelors, and completion of a credential program, they have proved high-level thinking and performance. The passing of a test means nothing if an individual can't control a class, can't collaborate with the community, can't relate material to students; all things that a test cannot evaluate. From personal experience, I have worked with a "genius" teacher who passed all … Read More

      Passing tests has no scientific backing to show teacher efficacy. If a teacher has received an associates, bachelors, and completion of a credential program, they have proved high-level thinking and performance. The passing of a test means nothing if an individual can’t control a class, can’t collaborate with the community, can’t relate material to students; all things that a test cannot evaluate.

      From personal experience, I have worked with a “genius” teacher who passed all CA tests with some of the highest marks I’ve heard of. The students learned absolutely nothing because they had zero classroom management or communication skills. Their contract was not renewed.

      There’s no perfect solution, but that is why schools and principals can opt not to renew contracts. There are fantastic future teachers held back by tests and current lousy teachers enabled by tests.

    • Carlos Medina 6 months ago6 months ago

      Believing the tests are easy is your experience, the truth is that they are a massive stumbling block for a large percentage of prospective teachers. Some of the CSETs failure rates hover above 60%. If the tests were a success at enabling only the most efficient and competent teachers in America, California's school tests score wouldn't be some of the lowest in the country. They've been in place long enough to establish a correlation, which … Read More

      Believing the tests are easy is your experience, the truth is that they are a massive stumbling block for a large percentage of prospective teachers. Some of the CSETs failure rates hover above 60%. If the tests were a success at enabling only the most efficient and competent teachers in America, California’s school tests score wouldn’t be some of the lowest in the country. They’ve been in place long enough to establish a correlation, which sadly has not been shown in data.

      It is more damaging for schools to have massive class sizes due to our overwhelming teacher shortage. The education involved in reaching a preliminary credential, in my opinion, is highly rigorous.

  30. Frank F Noey 6 months ago6 months ago

    Teachers hold a pivotal role in nurturing, educating and developing our children into people who will be of benefit to society. This legislation simply lowers the bar for someone to be a teacher. For those who wish to become teachers, they work very hard to achieve that goal. This legislation takes away the incentive for hard work and determination. But, that is what seems to be the norm anymore for some.

    Replies

    • Jeremy 6 months ago6 months ago

      This simply eliminates 1 barrier. Becoming a teachers still involves and associates degree, bachelors degree, and a credential program. If six+ years of schooling doesn’t show determination and hard work, a few tests surely won’t!

  31. T. Weller-Curtner 6 months ago6 months ago

    Funny thing – I remember a similar discussion concerning the quality of high school coursework and the SAT. Is it the exam or the prep?

  32. Pratibha Maurya 6 months ago6 months ago

    I think suspending these testing requirements to become teachers will be a smart move of the California government. It will open doors for many passionate teachers who want to teach in California but couldn't do it just because of these tests. I think when a person is taking graduate-level classes, and he/she is part of a rigorous teacher's Preparation program, then I think forcing them or blocking their way to teach is like taking away … Read More

    I think suspending these testing requirements to become teachers will be a smart move of the California government. It will open doors for many passionate teachers who want to teach in California but couldn’t do it just because of these tests.

    I think when a person is taking graduate-level classes, and he/she is part of a rigorous teacher’s Preparation program, then I think forcing them or blocking their way to teach is like taking away the support from those students who are struggling because of large class size and teacher is not able to provide enough support to the students. Additionally, I think replacing tests by grades and/or by course work is the best idea.

    Replies

    • Zeev Wurman 6 months ago6 months ago

      Those teachers that fail the (rather trivial) tests may be “passionate” but they also show themselves to be ignorant of any significant subject-matter knowledge.

      Would you like your children to be taught by such teachers? I thought so.

    • M Raum 6 months ago6 months ago

      Pratibha, I absolutely agree with you. I have taught pre-k & K in private schools, and have immense experience. I am passionate about teaching the younger grades e.g. TK/K/. I am in a grad program for an elementary credential. It seems an overkill to have to prepare for upper grade math and science, when my interest lies in teaching younger grades. Something needs to change about “tests” to qualify for becoming a teacher. I cannot … Read More

      Pratibha, I absolutely agree with you. I have taught pre-k & K in private schools, and have immense experience. I am passionate about teaching the younger grades e.g. TK/K/. I am in a grad program for an elementary credential. It seems an overkill to have to prepare for upper grade math and science, when my interest lies in teaching younger grades.

      Something needs to change about “tests” to qualify for becoming a teacher. I cannot wait to find out what the outcome will be.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

  33. Dr. Bill Conrad 6 months ago6 months ago

    With fewer than 1/2 of third graders overall being able to read as measured by pre-pandemic CAASSP and fewer than 1 out of 3 Black 3rd graders, it does not seem prudent to cut back on the tests required for a teaching credential. No? The colleges of education are woeful and produce teachers who are unprepared to be successful on the credentialing exams but worse yet unprepared in the content and … Read More

    With fewer than 1/2 of third graders overall being able to read as measured by pre-pandemic CAASSP and fewer than 1 out of 3 Black 3rd graders, it does not seem prudent to cut back on the tests required for a teaching credential. No?

    The colleges of education are woeful and produce teachers who are unprepared to be successful on the credentialing exams but worse yet unprepared in the content and pedagogy to be successful within the classroom.

    And guess who gets to be the recipients of these unprepared novices. You guessed it. Our Beautiful Black and Brown children..

    Since social emotional learning has become the coin of the realm, we might as well continue to downplay the importance of academic and pedagogical preparation.

    This is just more evidence of the need to totally transform K-12 education.

    More fog of education.
    http://sipbigpicture.com

  34. Gabrielle 6 months ago6 months ago

    What exactly would qualifying coursework be to satisfy the requirements for the CSETS?

    Replies

    • Tina 6 months ago6 months ago

      I think an example of qualifying coursework would be a full sequence of undergraduate biology courses to replace the CSET biology test.

      In my opinion I felt the CSET I, II, and III for science was really easy (probably because I graduated with a biology/chemistry degree) but I had to save up money for a month to take those tests. The bigger issue I think is how expensive it is to get a teacher credential in California.

      • Pratibha Maurya 6 months ago6 months ago

        I think it is so true that becomes a teacher is so expensive in California.

        • Sholem Duke 6 months ago6 months ago

          Why are those test expensive compare to other sates? Is that somehow indexed on the cost of leaving?

  35. ann 6 months ago6 months ago

    ‘Elementary school teachers must pass three tests — in science and math; reading, language, literature, history and social science; and physical education, human development and visual and performing arts — to earn a multiple-subject credential.’ CBest, RICA and what else?

    Replies

    • Aaron 6 months ago6 months ago

      CBEST, RICA, and CSETs (which are the most pointless in my opinion).

      • Alicia Perez 6 months ago6 months ago

        This is in response to the comment about less than half of our third graders being able to read pre pandemic. It has nothing to do with a teacher being able to pass a test. I’ve know teachers with several credentials and masters degrees who can’t teach. There are a couple of rarely mentioned factors that contribute to low performance in reading on the CAASSP. The first is that these tests are not developmentally appropriate … Read More

        This is in response to the comment about less than half of our third graders being able to read pre pandemic.

        It has nothing to do with a teacher being able to pass a test. I’ve know teachers with several credentials and masters degrees who can’t teach.

        There are a couple of rarely mentioned factors that contribute to low performance in reading on the CAASSP.

        The first is that these tests are not developmentally appropriate for our elementary students!!!

        Fact- The way that textbook publishers and testing companies have interpreted what children need to know according to the Common Core State standards has been driving how we are expected to teach children.

        These entities are clueless about child development! Everyone on those boards needs to be a child development expert if they’re going to be making decisions about the best way to educate and test children.

        How many of you had to read a non fiction and a fiction text about the same subject, had to synthesize that information, and write about it using text evidence in the 3rd, 4th, 5th grade? That is what the CAASSP is like. Most of us first had to do this in middle school. The state needs to go back to just straight up test for reading comprehension without the unnecessary acrobatics of the current tests. We need to test in a way that makes sense and is developmentally appropriate in the elementary grades.

        The second is that one teacher in an overloaded classroom is not going to be able to effectively do small group instruction with every child every day. This is a fact. We need to lower the class size in the primary grades AND have a full day teacher assistant in order for every child to get the attention that is needed to learn the basics.

        Since we adopted Common Core and the CAASSP tests, our students have not made any gains. Data in states that adopted Common Core proves this.

        Its time to change the way that we’ve been doing things this past decade. It simply hasn’t been working.

      • Ann 6 months ago6 months ago

        Do you now need to pass CSETs to teach elementary?