Teachers in Ukiah, Calif. hold a sign by Ethan Castro in protest against requirements that teachers must be on campus during distance learning.
This story was updated on August 8 at 4:56 p.m. with more information about Ukiah Unified's distance learning plans.

When Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered school districts to remain closed for in-person instruction in counties where coronavirus cases are spiking, some California teachers felt relieved. But now, several school districts are requiring teachers to conduct distance learning from their physical classrooms, sparking new fears as Covid-19 cases continue to climb across the state.

Earlier this summer, school districts considered bringing students and teachers back on campus for the new school year, at least part-time, and many teachers unions objected. State officials then released specific guidelines in July about when a school or district can resume in-person instruction. Protests are now re-emerging, this time among teachers being asked to live stream instruction from their empty classrooms.

San Jose Unified is one of those districts that plans to start its school year on Aug. 12 with teachers on campus while students stay home.

“Someone is going to get sick doing this, there is no doubt in my mind,” said Victoria Canote, a third-grade teacher at Trace Elementary School in San Jose Unified. “I think it defeats the purpose of distance learning.”

California schools are required to provide distance learning if they are located in counties on the state’s monitoring list due to increases in coronavirus cases. Schools can reopen for in-person instruction once they are off the list for 14 days, according to the California Department of Public Health guidance for school reopening released on July 17.

But the guidance has not completely erased concerns among teachers who may have to teach from empty classrooms this fall. Whether districts require teachers to conduct distance learning from campus is a local decision in California, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond said in a public briefing last week.

“School districts need to work with their employee groups to find some way to make an accommodation for those who have an underlying health condition,” Thurmond said. If possible, he added, districts should give them the opportunity to work remotely.

Newsom weighed in on the issue Monday, saying district leaders and labor unions should collaboratively decide whether school teachers should be required to conduct distance learning from their classrooms.

“I don’t believe anyone should be forced to put their lives and health at risk,” Newsom said. “If people feel their lives and health is being put at risk, it is incumbent on us to call that out.”

San Jose Unified officials want teachers to work from their classrooms so they have a steady Wi-Fi connection, tech support and access to classroom materials. They also believe it will help create a more consistent learning environment for students by allowing them to see their classrooms even if they aren’t on campus, said Stephen McMahon, deputy superintendent of San Jose Unified.

Accommodations will be available for teachers with underlying health conditions putting them at high risk of contracting Covid-19, or if they are caregivers to someone who is, McMahon said.

“All teachers will have a safety protocol to follow while on campus,” said Lili Smith, public information officer for San Jose Unified. “Should a teacher feel they are not able to be on campus, our HR department will work with them to set up accommodations to best meet their individual needs.”

Even with safety procedures, some teachers are fearful of returning to campus while coronavirus cases are climbing and want the option to teach from home.

“There are many districts that are not requiring teachers go in and saying you can do it from home,” said Canote, noting that some teachers would prefer to work in their classrooms but many prefer to work from home. “This is a huge district, so you open a lot of people to a lot of risk.”

While some school districts are still negotiating the issue, districts such as South San Francisco Unified and Fresno Unified are offering teachers the option of working from their classrooms or from home. And last week, following objections from the local teachers’ union, Los Angeles Unified agreed to drop a district proposal that would have had teachers work from their empty classrooms.

L.A. Unified on Monday announced it reached an agreement around distance learning, which will include a mix of live instruction and independent work for students from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., with at least 90 minutes of daily live instruction.

“We are gratified that the district abandoned its risky proposal to require all educators to teach from school sites,” said Arlene Inouye, bargaining co-chair for United Teachers Los Angeles, the union representing more than 30,000 L.A. Unified teachers and staff. “This will help protect the health and safety of our members, especially those with health conditions or at-risk family members at home.”

Further north, in Mendocino County, Ukiah Unified School District is also preparing for full distance learning when school starts Aug. 17, and teachers there are expected to lead instruction from their classrooms unless they obtain a waiver from the district.

Superintendent Debra Kubin said district officials want teachers on campus in order to offer teachers stable Wi-Fi in their rural community, as well as to give students a chance to see and feel connected to their classrooms that ideally they will return to later in the school year.

“For the most part, teachers will be in an empty classroom,” Kubin said. “We also put a lot of safety measures in place for our staff who have shared workspaces. We installed plexiglass and purchased air purifiers for classrooms and office buildings. We are doing daily cleaning and disinfection.”

But some teachers said bringing staff back on campus even in separate classrooms poses an unnecessary risk, especially for those with preexisting health conditions.

Last week about 50 teachers and community members part of Ukiah Unified rallied outside their district services center demanding the district provide teachers with the option to work from home during distance learning. Union leaders are preparing to continue demonstrations if conditions and plans don’t change.

District and union leaders came to an agreement on Wednesday that included a waiver option for teachers who do not feel they can safely teach from campus while students are away. The district said that they still hope that teachers will report to campus, where they believe they are likely to have fewer distractions, access to teaching materials, and that it would ease the transition back to school later on in the year.

Prior to the agreement, some Ukiah Unified teachers began seeking family leave through the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which requires some employers to provide paid sick leave or expanded medical leave for reasons related to Covid-19, according to Ukiah Teachers Association President Terry D’Selkie said on Monday. “Many teachers are filing for the Federal FFCRA family leave act,” she said. “We might have more teachers file than the district can get substitutes.”

Teachers in Manteca Unified School District near Stockton also held a rally last week in protest of the district’s plan to have them return to campus for distance learning.

Ken Johnson, president of the Manteca Educators’ Association, told the Daily Record, “Like all teachers, we want to be in the classroom with our students, but we want it to be as safe an environment as possible for everyone.”

Across California, teachers are organizing locally to push for more stringent thresholds before both students and teachers can return to campus.

Harley Litzelman, a history teacher at Skyline High School in Oakland Unified, launched an effort this summer demanding that schools not reopen until the county they are located in has been without any increase in Covid-19 cases for 14 consecutive days.

Newsom’s order meanwhile says schools can reopen if they are off the state’s watch list for two weeks, which would require meeting a set of criteria that includes reaching less than 100 cases per 100,000 residents over a two-week period.

More than 90,000 people have since signed a petition in favor of a stronger threshold and additional supports for teachers and students. Groups of teachers in Los Angeles, the Central Valley, Central Coast, San Diego and other areas have called for similar requirements in their local districts, as well as in several other states, including Mississippi and Tennessee.

Litzelman said districts should not require teachers to work from their classrooms, but should give teachers that option if they prefer it. “What they are doing is a form of bodily control. It’s truly about power,” he said.

Teachers rallying for stricter reopening thresholds got support last week from the American Federation of Teachers, the country’s second-largest teachers’ union, which announced it would support a strike if its 1.7 million members had exhausted all other negotiating tactics with their districts for a safe return.

The union is pushing for schools to not reopen physical classrooms until coronavirus transmission rates in a community are below 1% and average daily positive test rates stay below 5%. That will be difficult for many districts to achieve, however. Only two of the top 10 largest districts in the U.S. could reopen under those guidelines, a New York Times analysis found.

“Even if you don’t have any health concerns, there is no telling you won’t get sick,” said Canote, the San Jose Unified teacher. “I shouldn’t be worried about losing my job or dying on the job.”

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  1. Michelle 1 month ago1 month ago

    My daughter is an elementary teacher, is very high risk being pregnant, and with 2 other underlying conditions. She has a 2 year old with an underlying condition so childcare is not an option and has pretty much been stuck in a 2 bedroom apartment for this whole mess since March. You can only imagine how much fun that has been. Distance learning is not a cakewalk for the teachers, It’s more work especially … Read More

    My daughter is an elementary teacher, is very high risk being pregnant, and with 2 other underlying conditions. She has a 2 year old with an underlying condition so childcare is not an option and has pretty much been stuck in a 2 bedroom apartment for this whole mess since March. You can only imagine how much fun that has been. Distance learning is not a cakewalk for the teachers, It’s more work especially trying to keep a toddler entertained while live but it’s actually going better than expected and her students are engaged. She is working around the clock, is exhausted and is absolutely not resting on her laurels just collecting a paycheck like so many clueless people posting on social media imply. It is the best and safest option if we want this thing to end. These teachers are working their tails off trying to make this the best experience they can in very difficult circumstances. Quite frankly many are fighting depression and deeply saddened by the ugliness and false accusations so many parents have been throwing at the teachers. She works hard because she genuinely loves her class, cares deeply about their learning and is firmly dedicated to creating engaging content to keep them learning. She replies to the emails from parents at 11 pm asking questions and rarely gets a break. When she was forced to go to school for meetings; teachers even fully aware of her health risks, repeatedly pull down masks when talking and forget to maintain social distance. Honestly if the teachers can’t even follow the guidelines, how the heck are the kids supposed to? It’s not intentional, people just forget. I fully appreciate how difficult the distance-learning must be for the parents that are also trying to work as well, quite frankly there’s no great solution for anyone but putting my daughters life in danger is unacceptable and there is pressure to make them teach remote from the school. If they reopen and she wants to have a job and keep a roof over her head, pay off the astronomical student loan for her masters degree so she could be an amazing teacher for these kids, she has to endanger her life, the life of her son, and the life of her unborn baby; tell me, in what world is that OK? Sadly that seems to be ours if they go ahead with this. She wants to teach from home not because she is lazy but because she wants to live and getting Covid could easily kill her. Nobody should be forced to teach or attend class in unsafe conditions and there is no way to guarantee safety for anyone at this point. Teachers and parents deserve a choice and being forced into a roomful of people who can’t possibly be able to maintain distance that has no windows only one door for fresh air for hours on end is absolutely as unsafe as it gets for everyone and that scenario is true of the architecture for most schools. This can’t be compared to working conditions in a grocery store or a hotel with large spaces. It’s absolutely nuts that this is even being considered! At this rate this mess will never end.

  2. Karen Mooney 1 month ago1 month ago

    As a wife of a teacher who is high risk - and speaking as a registered nurse working in an acute care hospital - re-opening schools may very well end in catastrophe - for students and faculty. High school students in groups quickly lose their ability to stay distanced and observant of protective protocols - it just is the teenage brain and lack of maturity - not blaming them- "it is what it is". … Read More

    As a wife of a teacher who is high risk – and speaking as a registered nurse working in an acute care hospital – re-opening schools may very well end in catastrophe – for students and faculty. High school students in groups quickly lose their ability to stay distanced and observant of protective protocols – it just is the teenage brain and lack of maturity – not blaming them- “it is what it is”. Unfortunately, high risk individuals, and even a portion of not high risk people – will become ill, very likely needing hospitalization and/or dying from Covid-19. That is not an ethical choice to make – regardless of how you personally feel about the virus – it is here and is not fake. I am seeing rising numbers of positive inpatients at my institution in Orange County, yet am being told OC is gettng ready to come off the watchlist. HUH? We are not even close to performing the number of daily tests we need in order to have an accurate understanding of the current spread, and with the reported numbers being taken away from the CDC last month we are realistically looking at inaccurate information – many hospitals have been unable to use the “new” system the white house devised. Now we are being told that the “new” system was a “temporary measure”? (really?) and that hospitals are to go back to reporting to the CDC. So – IF everyone can start reporting accurately, and IF there is appropriate numbers of testing (not antibody testing nor serotype testing), we can then see true spread of disease. I am not willing to risk my husband nor my high school senior son simply to fulfill some OC bureaucrats and public school superintendents agendas. Following the science would be a great start – but it must BE the science – not political renderings of it.

  3. Flouting Measures 1 month ago1 month ago

    We are back on campus with no children present, and I’ll be frank, the measures put in place by the district aren’t being strictly followed. We have a good number of staff who aren’t “really all that crazy strict” about wearing their masks, and are careless when near other staff. Others mean well, but forget to put their masks on. And of course, we don’t have our masks on while appearing on camera in the … Read More

    We are back on campus with no children present, and I’ll be frank, the measures put in place by the district aren’t being strictly followed. We have a good number of staff who aren’t “really all that crazy strict” about wearing their masks, and are careless when near other staff. Others mean well, but forget to put their masks on. And of course, we don’t have our masks on while appearing on camera in the virtual classroom although there may be 3-4 of us in a closed room.

    There is an unspoken pressure to not appear “overly” concerned about the virus, and it is definitely impacting the behavior of many level headed people. The educated adults are not handling this situation well. I’m not sure how we could expect the children to do better when they return to campus.

  4. Harriet 2 months ago2 months ago

    Unlike a restaurant worker who has to be at the restaurant to do their job, a teacher does not have to be in a classroom since Zoom and other online portals exist. It is no longer “essential” that we work from the classroom. Sure, if there were no virus, it’s preferable. But not “essential.” Therefore, in the interest of bringing the numbers of those getting sick and dying down, teachers should work from home. … Read More

    Unlike a restaurant worker who has to be at the restaurant to do their job, a teacher does not have to be in a classroom since Zoom and other online portals exist. It is no longer “essential” that we work from the classroom. Sure, if there were no virus, it’s preferable. But not “essential.” Therefore, in the interest of bringing the numbers of those getting sick and dying down, teachers should work from home.

    Anxiety levels are already high (which can cause illness as well). We don’t need this added stress. No one is checking teachers’ temperatures in my district. The custodians were all laid off over the summer so the rooms (which were already filthy) are now even filthier. My classroom ceiling has leaked more times than I can count which means it has never been repaired properly. No doubt mold abounds.

    Many of our classrooms share the same air vents so just because we might be in the classroom alone doesn’t mean we’re not breathing common unfiltered air. The community where the schools are located has over 3000 known Covid cases and rising. The choice doesn’t need to be left up to individual districts. It needs to be made state-wide or even nationwide so we can finally bring and keep these numbers down. Obviously certain districts have leadership issues or there wouldn’t be so much disparity in student achievement.

    Judging from some of these posts, there is sentiment that if teachers aren’t in the classroom, they won’t be working. Sure, some won’t but then those same ones probably won’t be working in the classrooms either.

  5. Donna Noceti 2 months ago2 months ago

    Classified staff have been back (some for quite a while). Teachers being able to “work from home” sends a negative message that only their lives are valued. This is due to their union being stronger than the classified ranks, in general. Almost every profession has gone back to work by now. They cannot stay at home and get paid forever.

    Replies

    • Tayu Neogy 1 month ago1 month ago

      I completely agree with you! Our lives mean nothing. My district is making all classified staff work on site, but we were never told this! We only found out yesterday, our first day of work.

  6. liz 2 months ago2 months ago

    100% the school should be fully staffed while the students are at home learning virtually. If a teacher or any other faculty has a health condition that prevents them from working they can file for unemployment. The staff will certainly be 6 feet apart. Sounds like excuses not to go to work.

    Replies

    • Harriet 2 months ago2 months ago

      To the best of my knowledge, teachers can’t file for unemployment unless they are fired.

  7. Kevin 2 months ago2 months ago

    I realize people are worried and nervous about Covid-19. Teachers are talking about striking, quitting, pleading to not return to work. I understand the anxiety but…. do these same people go to the grocery store, restaurants, shopping of any kind??
    What if those employees went on strike, those businesses refused to open? Would you be mad at them? Would you say they should go to work?

    Replies

    • Seth 2 months ago2 months ago

      The difference is being in a room (most likely without good ventilation) for hours at a time. That is the difference. If one of those people in the room has the virus, the chances of all in the room will have it with time and lack of air flow rises tremendously.

    • yvonne 2 months ago2 months ago

      I have a choice to go into a grocery store, and what time. I do not go in and interact with 12 people in one aisle for 5+ hours, for two days a week (hybrid) then come back to that same aisle, the two other days a week with 12 more people 5+ hours each day. Notice I didn't say the whole store. The aisle about covers it for social distancing space and 12 … Read More

      I have a choice to go into a grocery store, and what time. I do not go in and interact with 12 people in one aisle for 5+ hours, for two days a week (hybrid) then come back to that same aisle, the two other days a week with 12 more people 5+ hours each day. Notice I didn’t say the whole store. The aisle about covers it for social distancing space and 12 people. If we are talking about full in person, then I will say that I don’t go into a grocery store 5 days a week, into one aisle and remain with 20-30 people for 5+ hours each day.

      And no, I would not demand that home depot employees go to work so the store can stay open for me.

  8. JACK 2 months ago2 months ago

    This is a classic example of why public educators feel undervalued and disrespected. The child's experiences are not enhanced by having the teacher physically in a classroom while the children are at home. It still remains a distance learning experience for the child. What is worse – it places the teacher in a more vulnerable situation health wise by increasing exposure to others. It is different than shopping for groceries; that can be … Read More

    This is a classic example of why public educators feel undervalued and disrespected. The child’s experiences are not enhanced by having the teacher physically in a classroom while the children are at home. It still remains a distance learning experience for the child. What is worse – it places the teacher in a more vulnerable situation health wise by increasing exposure to others.

    It is different than shopping for groceries; that can be done from home. It does not require physically going into a store. Most activities required for daily living and support for a family can be done from home. Why do we refuse to acknowledge this and remain as socially distant as possible?

    I have yet to hear of a reasonable explanation for why teachers need to be physically in a classroom to provide a quality distance learning experience to children. If there is a reasonable explanation will someone please fill me in?

    Stay Home! Stay Well! Stay Safe! If we all practiced this for 4 weeks, this pandemic might be brought under control.

  9. Judy Cunningham 2 months ago2 months ago

    Food for thought: Teachers have their resources, including technology, visuals, white boards, books and more in their classrooms. Therefore, even though it may not be safe to bring our students back just yet, teachers can be in their classroom – a professional environment that students can identify with. Student attendance at class – virtually in their classroom – brings a layer of participative expectation and familiarity with a learning space. Teachers being in the school … Read More

    Food for thought:

    Teachers have their resources, including technology, visuals, white boards, books and more in their classrooms. Therefore, even though it may not be safe to bring our students back just yet, teachers can be in their classroom – a professional environment that students can identify with. Student attendance at class – virtually in their classroom – brings a layer of participative expectation and familiarity with a learning space.

    Teachers being in the school could meet to collaborate virtually or in small groups in a large room to collaborate on learning outcomes, strategies, student progress, challenges and successes. Let’s put professionals back in their professional space and ready for students returning whenever that is possible.

  10. Art 2 months ago2 months ago

    The classroom is already a safe place for a teacher alone. It is no more dangerous than your bedroom. Common areas are safe as long as everyone wears masks and practices hand hygiene. This is not rocket science. I am assuming that those afraid of entering campus never go to the grocery store, or to Walmart, or to a clothing store. Also, that they never speak to their neighbors, that their children are forbidden from playing with … Read More

    The classroom is already a safe place for a teacher alone. It is no more dangerous than your bedroom.

    Common areas are safe as long as everyone wears masks and practices hand hygiene. This is not rocket science.

    I am assuming that those afraid of entering campus never go to the grocery store, or to Walmart, or to a clothing store. Also, that they never speak to their neighbors, that their children are forbidden from playing with friends, etc.

    If teachers are screened daily and follow basic guidelines there is no more risk at a school site than at any other public place.

    Stop making excuses to stay at home. We belong in the classroom, preferably with students.

    Replies

    • Paul 2 months ago2 months ago

      Why not look at this logically and mathematically? The risk of infection and severe illness depends on the frequency and duration of contact and, naturally, on the likelihood of encountering infected people. The grocery store may relatively safe, but you don't want to go every day, and you don't want to linger all day, especially if you live in a community where substantial numbers of new cases are still being reported every day. Because teachers *can* work … Read More

      Why not look at this logically and mathematically? The risk of infection and severe illness depends on the frequency and duration of contact and, naturally, on the likelihood of encountering infected people.

      The grocery store may relatively safe, but you don’t want to go every day, and you don’t want to linger all day, especially if you live in a community where substantial numbers of new cases are still being reported every day.

      Because teachers *can* work from home, it is safer for them to stay there. Premature, gung-ho reopening has demonstrated that we cannot explain away risk.

      • Art 2 months ago2 months ago

        As it turns out, math and logic are my areas of expertise. That's why I'm basing my comments on facts, not fear. To my knowledge their have been no outbreaks due to occupational exposure among grocery workers. (Yes, I know about the meatpacking plants. That was early, and they were not following proper workplace protocols). To my knowledge their have been no outbreaks due to occupational exposure among hotel workers since hotels reopened. To my knowledge their have … Read More

        As it turns out, math and logic are my areas of expertise. That’s why I’m basing my comments on facts, not fear.

        To my knowledge their have been no outbreaks due to occupational exposure among grocery workers. (Yes, I know about the meatpacking plants. That was early, and they were not following proper workplace protocols).
        To my knowledge their have been no outbreaks due to occupational exposure among hotel workers since hotels reopened.
        To my knowledge their have been no outbreaks due to occupational exposure among bank employees since branches reopened.
        To my knowledge their have been no outbreaks due to occupational exposure among restaurant workers since restaurants reopened.

        These are all professions that encounter at least as many people each day as teachers, and the majority are not prescreening customers the way districts plan to screen teachers and students.

        There are mountains of evidence, that educators love to quote when asking for funding, which establish the benefits of having students in the classroom. There is no evidence that having students in classrooms (this coming out of Europe and Asia) increases the rate of community spread.

  11. Paul 2 months ago2 months ago

    Teachers might be alone in their classrooms, but they make multiple daily visits to common areas such as the staff room (to store, retrieve and warm lunch), the office, and the restroom. Are shared spaces large enough for the occupants to practice social distancing? Are they well ventilated? Can they be cleaned throughout the day? It amazes me that district leaders forget the risk of commuting. Teachers don't land magically in their classrooms every morning at … Read More

    Teachers might be alone in their classrooms, but they make multiple daily visits to common areas such as the staff room (to store, retrieve and warm lunch), the office, and the restroom. Are shared spaces large enough for the occupants to practice social distancing? Are they well ventilated? Can they be cleaned throughout the day?

    It amazes me that district leaders forget the risk of commuting. Teachers don’t land magically in their classrooms every morning at 7:30 AM! In urban districts, many rely on public transit. Why impose extra risk on people who *can* work from home?

    We hear over and over again that itinerant workers — contract nurses in seniors’ homes, and recently, security guards at quarantine hotels in Melbourne — spread the virus *between* work sites. Principals, presumably, would meet other principals and district leaders. Substitute teachers move from school to school.

    I’m also curious about the perspectives of classified employees. Here again, some people, like school secretaries, *can* work from home. It doesn’t seem that bringing teachers back to the school building, without students, would allow many furloughed workers to be recalled. For example, crossing guards and lunchroom supervisors still wouldn’t have work. Could janitors trust that enough of their own colleagues would be brought back to go from essential cleaning of closed buildings to regular, daily cleaning of classrooms, staff restrooms, etc.?

    I hope that certificated and classified employee unions will say no, no, no, until it is truly safe to reopen the schools!

  12. Djs 2 months ago2 months ago

    If a school district in San Jose can’t figure out how to put a teacher online with their classroom in the background, they clearly can’t be trusted to clean the bathroom properly. I predict that the poo will hit the fan when one teacher gets sick or a staff meeting is called, whichever comes first.

  13. Ken Brown 2 months ago2 months ago

    I am not thrilled with the current situation in my district which is still discussing the MOU about where I will start to teach from next week. The district is being strong about wanting teachers to be in their empty classrooms. I teach in an area that Covid is still growing and growing like the crops in the fields starting 1/2 a mile down the road. I don't want to get sick by going to … Read More

    I am not thrilled with the current situation in my district which is still discussing the MOU about where I will start to teach from next week. The district is being strong about wanting teachers to be in their empty classrooms. I teach in an area that Covid is still growing and growing like the crops in the fields starting 1/2 a mile down the road. I don’t want to get sick by going to my classroom – and I have heard I will not be alone as my paraprofessional will be there with me. Other SPED teachers near me have 3 paraprofessionals.

    I do not see the best interest of staff safety in this requirement to be onsite. I am ready and willing to work in a safe environment. I see my home as this safe place. I am willing to keep using my internet and phone at home that I pay for to do my job. I wish that I could see my school site as being a safe place right now.

    I am not happy when I have driven through areas and seen people not wearing masks and not socially distancing. It makes me more worried about how long it will take before Covid can calm down and some normalcy can return, including it being safe to return to the classroom for staff and students.

  14. Dee 2 months ago2 months ago

    This is exactly how a beloved 1st grade teacher in Arizona just died from Covid. It’s all over the news. Distance teaching from a classroom with no students. Teachers lives matter!

  15. Christopher Chiang 2 months ago2 months ago

    How are these superintendents and school board members in positions of power? Not only does sending teachers into empty classrooms make them less productive than teaching from home (less comfortable, more likely to leave early to tend to family), but it may also be more dangerous if staff begin to interact (who wouldn't interact after being alone in a room?). Hold a high standard for remote learning, ensure teachers have the right hardware and software, … Read More

    How are these superintendents and school board members in positions of power? Not only does sending teachers into empty classrooms make them less productive than teaching from home (less comfortable, more likely to leave early to tend to family), but it may also be more dangerous if staff begin to interact (who wouldn’t interact after being alone in a room?).

    Hold a high standard for remote learning, ensure teachers have the right hardware and software, create spaces to learn/share, and pay for wifi for teachers who don’t have it at home. Which district has time for this silliness?