The following three measures on the Nov. 3, 2020 ballot have implications for California’s public education system and young people:

  • Proposition 15 would raise commercial and industrial property taxes, producing billions of dollars in new revenue for schools and community colleges, as well as for county and local governments.  The initiative needs a simple majority for passage. Although currently, it is too early to know the final outcome.
  • Proposition 16 would have allowed the state to consider in some fashion race, ethnicity and gender in admissions to the state’s public colleges and universities, as well as public-agency hiring and contracting. Voters have rejected this initiative.
  • Proposition 18 would have allowed 17-year-olds to vote in primary and special elections if they turned 18 during the same year as the next general election.  Voters have rejected this initiative.

Scroll down for the latest vote tally from the California Secretary of State’s office for these ballot measures. Please note that even though the results below indicate that 100% of precincts have reported votes, millions more in additional absentee, mail-in and provisional ballots have yet to be counted as of 8 p.m. on Nov. 4.  

 

 

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  1. Sue McNeilly 3 weeks ago3 weeks ago

    Regarding a voting at the age of 17, I agree with Adrian Ortiz! One may have had great parents who guided them well on how to vote responsibly. What about those who were not taught well? I would guess most were not or this topic is never discussed in the home. One needs life experience, such as a job, paying bills, paying taxes, real estate ownership, to better understand the effects of voting for a presidents, propositions, … Read More

    Regarding a voting at the age of 17, I agree with Adrian Ortiz!

    One may have had great parents who guided them well on how to vote responsibly. What about those who were not taught well?

    I would guess most were not or this topic is never discussed in the home. One needs life experience, such as a job, paying bills, paying taxes, real estate ownership, to better understand the effects of voting for a presidents, propositions, state governors, senators, etc. and how their vote effects their own life and not their parents.

    At the age of 17 most have not had these experiences.

  2. Star 3 weeks ago3 weeks ago

    It is a shame that folks are not willing to spend money to improve schools. Improving schools helps attract families. Parents look at school ratings when looking where they want to live. The areas that have loose schools will only attract seniors and investors and bring lots of rental properties to an area and drive house prices down. Can kiss nice house equity goodbye. The bonds would have raised the amount of … Read More

    It is a shame that folks are not willing to spend money to improve schools. Improving schools helps attract families. Parents look at school ratings when looking where they want to live. The areas that have loose schools will only attract seniors and investors and bring lots of rental properties to an area and drive house prices down. Can kiss nice house equity goodbye. The bonds would have raised the amount of tax per 100k by 40 dollars and raised the house price probably 100k or more.

    Quite the bummer….small investment for a big prize, not to mention it shows to improve quality of community.

  3. Adrian Ortiz 4 weeks ago4 weeks ago

    I think that it’s bad that people that are 17 can vote because most opinions on politics are influenced by their parents. For example if your dad likes the Patriots, you aren’t going to go for the enemy team. You just don’t do that. And if your dad likes Trump and you like Trump it’s just what you do. Kids don’t influence themselves about politics because it doesn’t affect them if they’re living under their parents roof.

    Replies

    • John Fensterwald 4 weeks ago4 weeks ago

      Adrian, that’s why we have secret ballots