Theresa Harrington
Richmond High student Brenda Diaz holds letter informing her she cannot graduate because she didn't pass the exit exam.

The state Assembly on Thursday approved a bill that would exempt seniors in the class of 2015 from the requirement to pass the California High School Exit Exam to graduate.

In a 77­-1 vote, Assembly members showed overwhelming support for SB 725, by Sen. Loni Hancock, D­-Oakland, which proposes to waive the requirement for the class of 2015 to pass the exam to receive diplomas.

Hancock gutted and amended her bill earlier this week to fast-­track the urgency legislation following media reports about students left in limbo when the state Department of Education canceled the July administration of the exam.

Assemblyman Travis Allen, R­-Huntington Beach, was the lone vote against the bill. Allen could not be reached for comment.

Hancock’s spokesman Larry Levin said the bill will head to the Senate for approval on Monday and could be signed by Gov. Jerry Brown sometime next week. If Brown approves the bill, it would go into effect immediately, paving the way for districts across the state to grant diplomas to up to 5,000 students in the class of 2015 who had fulfilled all graduation requirements except for passing the exam.

The San Francisco school board issued diplomas to its high school seniors who met all other graduation requirements last Friday, after some complained that their college admissions were rescinded because they hadn’t graduated.

Senate Bill 172 by Sen. Carol Liu, D-­La Canada Flintridge, proposes to suspend the exit exam through 2017­-18 to give the state time to decide whether a new test should be administered that is aligned with Common Core standards. It is expected to be discussed later this month.

SHARE ARTICLE

Comments

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments Policy

The goal of the comments section on EdSource is to facilitate thoughtful conversation about content published on our website. Click here for EdSource's Comments Policy.

  1. My'quaisia 1 year ago1 year ago

    I want to know how does it work

  2. Gary Ravani 1 year ago1 year ago

    The following is an excerpt from a Hetchinger Reprt article given as link on this sites opening page re "thousands of qualified CA students turned away for state university system." "He ( a UC?CSU applicant) might not have been, had he considered that, between 2007 and 2012, California trimmed $2 billion from the Cal State and UC budgets, essentially cutting per-student funding in half. At the same time, it gave more spots to out-of-state and … Read More

    The following is an excerpt from a Hetchinger Reprt article given as link on this sites opening page re “thousands of qualified CA students turned away for state university system.”

    “He ( a UC?CSU applicant) might not have been, had he considered that, between 2007 and 2012, California trimmed $2 billion from the Cal State and UC budgets, essentially cutting per-student funding in half. At the same time, it gave more spots to out-of-state and international students who pay the full cost of their educations while turning down Hotchkiss and thousands of other qualified Californians.

    At UC campuses, California residents pay $14,000 in tuition and fees per year, compared to $38,000 for nonresidents. Californians pay $5,472 for the Cal State system, while nonresidents pay an additional $372 per semester unit or $248 per quarter unit, which works out to at least $8,928 extra per year for full-time out-of-state students.
    California once showed the world how a state could guarantee a college education for nearly every resident, but then it failed to provide the long-term funding to do it, said Martha Kanter, a former U.S. education undersecretary and California community college leader.”

    CA’s K-12 system is producing far more college ready students than the UC or CSU system an accommodate. The big problem in CA and the charge of not providing more residents with BA degrees? Not the K-12 system which, in some terms, might be said to be doing too good a job. The real problem is low funding, budget cuts, and a state revenue stream that cannot support the K-12 system not the two university systems adequately even though they take up 50% of the (too small) state budget.

  3. Parent 1 year ago1 year ago

    Most kids pass CASHEE in their sophomore year. And they need it to get into CSU?

    I bet the CSU’s are excited to get even more unprepared students from the union schools.

    Might as well print the diplomas on toilet paper.

  4. Richard Moore 1 year ago1 year ago

    You think Travis Allen is a Democrat???

  5. crystal james 1 year ago1 year ago

    Hi my names is crystal and i was denied my high school diploma and i finished all high school requirements in 1992 so that really ruined my life!!! Ive been wanting a good job or just a job period but they want a high school diploma. Do i still go to a adult school and get a ged now or can i get my records. PLz help me..