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The $115.4 billion state budget that Gov. Jerry Brown signed on June 24 and takes effect July 1 is full of numbers – big ones when it comes to record high spending for K-12 schools and community colleges. Here are some of the key dollar amounts, including funding for new programs, for 2015-16.

$68.4 billion: The projected minimum guarantee in 2015-16 for Proposition 98, the primary source of funding for K-12 schools, community colleges and state preschool.

  •  $7.6 billion: Increase in Prop. 98 minimum guarantee in 2015-16 budget  compared with minimum guarantee in 2014-15 budget.
  • $13.6 billion: Total increase in ongoing and one-time Prop. 98 funding in 2015-16 because of surging revenue since adoption of 2014-15 budget.

$75.9 billion: Total budgeted spending in 2015-16 for K-12, including federal funds, school construction bonds and non-Prop. 98 contributions to school employee pensions. (Update: When additional local school revenues, including parcel taxes, property sales. some federal funds paid directly to districts and transportation fees are included, the total rises to $83 billion, according to the Department of Finance.)

$59.5 billion: Portion of Prop. 98 in 2015-16 going to K-12.

  • $9,942: 98 average per-student funding in 2015-16. Under the Local Control Funding Formula, district averages could be several thousand dollars per student above or below the statewide average.
  • $1,011: 98 average per-student funding increase (11 percent) over 2014-15 budget. Amounts will vary from district to district.

$7.9 billion: Portion of Prop. 98 in 2015-16 going to community colleges.

  • $6,379: Community college funding per full-time equivalent student in 2015-16.
  • $626: Increase in community college funding per full-time equivalent student (11 percent) over 2014-15 budget.

K-12 one-time spending

  • $3.2 billion: Reimbursement to schools for unfunded state mandates.
  • $897 million: Final payoff of deferrals, which are late payments to school districts; many had to borrow money to balance their books in recent years.
  • $900 million: Three-year competitive grant program for high quality career technical education partnerships with businesses and the community. The program will allocate $400 million in 2015-16 to small, medium and large partnerships.
  • $490 million: Teacher training and support block grant to be spent over three years for professional development and help for new and struggling teachers.
  • $40 million: Additional dollars to county offices of education intended to be used to oversee districts’ Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAPs); the money will be distributed based on the number of districts in a county.

K-12 ongoing spending

  • $6 billion: Increase in the Local Control Funding Formula, bringing school districts to an estimated 70 percent of full funding of the formula.
  • $500 million: New total for adult education funding, with $375 million for existing programs and the rest to support new regional consortia.
  • $67 million ($52 million ongoing, $15 million one-time): Amount for programs carrying out recommendations of task force on special education, with most to expand services for infants, toddlers and preschoolers with disabilities

Community colleges

  • $267 million: Increase that districts can use for any educational or operational purpose.
  • $157 million: Amount provided for 3 percent enrollment growth.
  • $200 million: Increase for the Student Success and Support Program, including $100 million for assessment, placement, orientation, and counseling services and $85 million to improve access and outcomes for disadvantaged groups.

State preschool

  • $220 million: Increase in preschool funding under Prop. 98 – enough to fund 9,530 new slots and substantially increase reimbursement rates to providers. This includes $145 million that was shifted into Prop. 98 from the General Fund that was not new preschool funding
  • $885 million: What the state will spend on preschool under Prop. 98 in 2015-16.

Remaining debt to K-12 schools after 2015-16

  • $1.2 billion: Amount for unfunded mandates yet to be paid to districts.
  • $772 million: Amount still owed to school districts for past years’ minimum guarantee under Prop. 98, called the maintenance factor.

Sources: Legislative Analyst’s Office, California Department of Finance, Assembly Bill 104 (trailer bill).


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  1. Joanne Schultz 1 year ago1 year ago

    We really appreciate the levels of increased funding. However while K12 is getting less strings on its funding, Community Colleges are getting more. Every Community College has different needs given the make up of the population but we are all funded the same. Lots of funding for Student Services but the other support services are strangled, Finance, Facilities, IT etc. One time money helps with technology and facilities but not the people that try to … Read More

    We really appreciate the levels of increased funding. However while K12 is getting less strings on its funding, Community Colleges are getting more. Every Community College has different needs given the make up of the population but we are all funded the same. Lots of funding for Student Services but the other support services are strangled, Finance, Facilities, IT etc. One time money helps with technology and facilities but not the people that try to stay on top of service requests. Any help in this area would be much appreciated.

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