After nearly two decades of providing data on the state’s K-12 public schools, the Education Data Partnership is overhauling its website with a new look and updated interface that make the data easier to understand, use and share. The new site, a preview of which was released today, also provides key information about the state’s new funding system.

In a departure from the current Ed-Data website, which primarily provides tables of numbers, the new site offers charts that show five-year trends. By clicking on the chart, the numbers behind the graphs are still easily accessible. The new charts can also be printed, downloaded into Excel, copied and pasted into presentations, or shared on social media.

The redesigned Ed-Data site also provides unduplicated pupil counts for English learners, foster youth and students eligible for free and reduced-price meals – information that is used by the state’s new funding formula to calculate additional funds for schools serving those high-needs students.

Ed-Data is maintained through a collaboration of the California Department of Education, EdSource and the Fiscal Crisis & Management Assistance Team (FCMAT). It provides financial, demographic, performance, staffing and election data for schools, school districts, counties, and the state.

The redesign is expected to be completed next summer, but the partnership wanted to give the public an opportunity to try out the new data presentation and functionality and provide feedback to improve future iterations of the site. While the new site is being built, the current Ed-Data site, which contains data going back to 1994, will remain available.

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  1. Smita Patel 5 years ago5 years ago

    Jeff: Thank you! Your kind words are very much appreciated. Navigio: The Ed-Data Partnership is committed to ensuring that all the functionality on the current site is carried over to the new site. We also plan to continue all the data tables available on the current site, with the exception of data that are no longer used or collected, such as the STAR tests and "school technology." The main reason for rolling out a partial … Read More

    Jeff: Thank you! Your kind words are very much appreciated.

    Navigio: The Ed-Data Partnership is committed to ensuring that all the functionality on the current site is carried over to the new site. We also plan to continue all the data tables available on the current site, with the exception of data that are no longer used or collected, such as the STAR tests and “school technology.”

    The main reason for rolling out a partial release of the new site now is to give folks a chance to take it for a spin, kick the tires and tell us what works and what needs improvement. This will guide us as we build out the rest of the reports and tables and the team is paying careful attention to all the feedback we receive.

    You can send feedback to ed-data@edsource.org.

    Many thanks!

  2. Jeff Camp 5 years ago5 years ago

    Hey, EdSource commenter community — let’s show some love, here. The data and charts available on the Ed-Data partnership site are a vitally important resource, and now they look like a LOT more presentable, don’t they?

    Replies

    • navigio 5 years ago5 years ago

      :-) It was less what the charts look like and more what they reference and how they are presented. While these are clearly 'better' in that they use updated technology (which in theory can provide more adaptability, though it comes with other costs), the "old" site also provided many other useful tools that are not specific to graphs. It is not clear how much of that will be preserved and via what technology. In that sense, … Read More

      🙂

      It was less what the charts look like and more what they reference and how they are presented.

      While these are clearly ‘better’ in that they use updated technology (which in theory can provide more adaptability, though it comes with other costs), the “old” site also provided many other useful tools that are not specific to graphs. It is not clear how much of that will be preserved and via what technology. In that sense, it is too early to comment on anything other than the graphics. 🙂

      If you really care, I do have many, um m-a-n-y, comments were I willing to make assumptions about the new site from what is presented here. But that’s not really fair. And plus the commenting system wouldn’t support the size… 😉