Credit: John C. Osborn/EdSource Today
All three contributors to retirement benefits for teachers – teachers themselves, the state and school districts – would pay more under the legislation approved this year. Districts would absorb 70 percent of the increase, rising from several hundred million dollars this year to nearly $3.7 billion annually in 2020-21.

Here are the education highlights from the 2014-15 California budget negotiations.

Fiscal year covers July of the year mentioned to June 30 of the next year. Example: fiscal year 2014 is July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015.

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  1. Jessica Sawko 2 years ago2 years ago

    Thank you for the breakdown of the budget. I have one recommended change – for your Common Core funding – it should actually be new standards funding as Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards, and ELD standards are all clearly spelled out in the budget language. Thanks again for the summary.

  2. navigio 2 years ago2 years ago

    so what happens to the contribution to teachers who were hired after 2013?
    also, dynamic graphs with related data that have different axis scales are confusing.. 🙂

    Replies

    • John Fensterwald 2 years ago2 years ago

      navigio: The increase for teachers and administrators hired after Jan. 1, 2013 would be less. They are currently paying 8 percent of their paychecks. That will rise to 8.08 percent next year and top off at 9.21 percent in 2016-17, compared with 10.25 percent of pay for veteran teachers. As a group, they would contribute $1 million more into the system next year and a projected $98 million more by 2020-21, as more of them … Read More

      navigio: The increase for teachers and administrators hired after Jan. 1, 2013 would be less. They are currently paying 8 percent of their paychecks. That will rise to 8.08 percent next year and top off at 9.21 percent in 2016-17, compared with 10.25 percent of pay for veteran teachers. As a group, they would contribute $1 million more into the system next year and a projected $98 million more by 2020-21, as more of them are hired, according to the LAO report on the state budget.

  3. Lydia 2 years ago2 years ago

    Just because the state claims it's giving an amount to schools, doesn't mean they are. If we could just get what the state claims we're going to get, we'd be fine! What's in the state budget is quite different than actual monies received. Go to your superintendent of schools to see what your local district receives vs. what was promised. It was explained to me, the state borrows from the amount promised, and just … Read More

    Just because the state claims it’s giving an amount to schools, doesn’t mean they are. If we could just get what the state claims we’re going to get, we’d be fine! What’s in the state budget is quite different than actual monies received. Go to your superintendent of schools to see what your local district receives vs. what was promised. It was explained to me, the state borrows from the amount promised, and just never gets caught up.